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View Poll Results: Best alliance interpretation / worst alliance interpretation
Best: Dwarven Clans 3 30.00%
Best: Lordaeron 2 20.00%
Best: Alterac 2 20.00%
Best: Gilneas 2 20.00%
Best: Kul Tiras 2 20.00%
Best: High elves 5 50.00%
Best: Dalaran 3 30.00%
Best: Stromgarde 1 10.00%
Worst: Dwarven Clans 2 20.00%
Worst: Lordaeron 1 10.00%
Worst: Alterac 1 10.00%
Worst: Gilneas 2 20.00%
Worst: Kul Tiras 2 20.00%
Worst: High elves 1 10.00%
Worst: Dalaran 1 10.00%
Worst: Stromgarde 1 10.00%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 10. You may not vote on this poll

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  #51  
Old 02-02-2014, 09:43 AM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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Originally Posted by Kir the Wizard View Post
Yeah. Or perhaps the elf-fanboys among the new mages wanted everything around it to be elfy.
Just like you two, you mean? I kid, I kid. It was too easy an opportunity

I think you're overestimating the influence of elven culture on early human mages. While the first human mages were trained by elves, it was over a fairly short period and for a specific purpose (which did not include 'learning elven culture'). Afterwards, it seems contact between humans and elves fell by the wayside almost completely, at least until the formation of the circle of Tirisfal (or, in this continuity, until Arathor called them in to force Dalaran to remain part of the empire). There really isn't any opportunity for the humans to even know elven culture by the time they named Dalaran.

Quote:
Both of which are held by people of magician (AKA elven-influenced) culture.

(And at that I'd argue that Dalar Dawnweaver could have easily been an elven, or at least half-elven archmage)
Fair points there though.
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  #52  
Old 02-02-2014, 09:55 AM
Kir the Wizard Kir the Wizard is offline

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I come from WC3 where all caster units were elves and Dalaran used elven architecture for all its unique magic buildings. Don't judge me!
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  #53  
Old 02-02-2014, 09:59 AM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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Originally Posted by Kir the Wizard View Post
I come from WC3 where all caster units were elves and Dalaran used elven architecture for all its unique magic buildings. Don't judge me!
Heh.

I do agree that elven culture likely became really big in Dalaran eventually. By the time of Warcraft III, it's pretty much become a human/elven hybrid town, at least among the casters. It's just something that had to develop over time though, rather than be there from the beginning.
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  #54  
Old 02-02-2014, 10:36 AM
Kir the Wizard Kir the Wizard is offline

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Originally Posted by ijffdrie View Post
Heh.

I do agree that elven culture likely became really big in Dalaran eventually. By the time of Warcraft III, it's pretty much become a human/elven hybrid town, at least among the casters. It's just something that had to develop over time though, rather than be there from the beginning.
Indeed, now go comment on MY thread, you creative mind, you!
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  #55  
Old 02-08-2014, 07:47 PM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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Edited the reference from serf to slave, because that indeed made more sense.

Also, last tribes:

The Darkcloud Tribe
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Originally Posted by Hamuul Runetotem
My vow of neutrality forbids me to speak on the subject of the Darkcloud. This should tell you enough about my opinion of them.
The darkcloud are a powerful village-based tribe, stemming from the lower dry hills. They are a radical tribe, and were one of the first major tauren tribes to cast off tradition, starting to farm rather than hunt for food. Rather than employing naturalists, their rituals are led by moon-singers. Dedicated to the worship of the sky-father, these moon-singers speak only in ancient verses from the darkcloud scrolls, invoking ancient words of power against their enemies.
The darkcloud are aggressive, one of the few tribes to actually go on the offensive against the other races of the barrens. A darkcloud is not considered an adult until he has slain a quilboar, a harpy or a centaur. Darkcloud warriors actually prefer using weaponry taken from slain enemies over traditional charms, seeing these salvaged items as charms that were blessed by the sky-father. The darkcloud hold no love for the other tauren tribes, but they do ally out of necessity on occasion. Recently, they have entered in an alliance with the grimtotem tribe.

The Winterhoof Tribe
The winterhoof are a nomadic tribe of tauren who live in Winterspring, all the way in the northern end of Kalimdor. Because of the distances involved, and the secretive nature of the night elves with whom the winterhoof are allied, contact with the southern tribes is very rare.
The winterhoof have a very complex spirituality, combining aspects of tauren and druidic beliefs. Winterhoof naturalists recognize not only the spirits that compose the earth-mother, but also the spirits of the emerald dream, drawing complex schemes of relations between these beings and how they affect the world around them. Seasons, dragonflights, plants and constellations are thrown into the mix as well, resulting in what is probably the single most complicated spiritual scheme known to the people of Azeroth.
The winterhoof say that their understanding of the relation between spirits is what is responsible for their skill at alchemy. There may be some truth to this, as the winterhoof skill at alchemy is absolutely legendary, and the potions they produce are not only treasured throughout Kalimdor, but are exported by the steamwheedle cartel to Kezan and the Eastern Kingdoms as well, where they are sold at exorbitant prices.

The Runetotem Tribe
The most ancient and revered tribe of tauren still in existence are the legendary runetotem tribe. They are the keepers of tauren lore, maintaining thousands upon thousands of years of history. The runetotem tribe makes its home among the stonetalon mountains, where they have settled near the bones of the earth-mother, a rock formation said by the runetotem to signify the pact between the earth-mother and her taur-ahe children.
In tauren tradition, the runetotem hold a unique place as the curators of tauren history. While they aren't nomadic, this is not a breach of tradition, but something that's outright expected of them. They need to stay in one location to both protect the bones of the earth-mother from other species and to keep the enormous number of scrolls they need to keep. The tauren have records of every tauren tribe that has ever existed, all tauren who have earned a hero-name, assorted knowledge donated to them by the other tribes and ancient legends.
The runetotem serve not just as keepers of tradition, but also critical roles in many traditions. They perform the ceremonies to crown a new chieftain, they organize gatherings of the various tauren clans and are often called in to serve as arbiters in conflict between clans. Because of such traditions, the runetotem are under an oath of neutrality, which forbids them from siding with or against any other tauren tribe.
The runetotem have the unique naturalist tradition of lorewalkers. While most tauren naturalists focus on the spirits of the wild in their communion with the earth-mother, the runetotem lorewalkers focus on the spirits of the ancestors. Using the power of thousands of generations of tauren tradition, they have become capable of actually bringing to life some of the most ancient tauren traditions, summoning forth spiritual beings from the tales of old.
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  #56  
Old 02-13-2014, 01:37 AM
Kir the Wizard Kir the Wizard is offline

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If you don't mind, I'd like to line up my reasons for why I don't think "Lothar" should be the family name. Mostly to send the link to Sean.

1) In Warcraft 1 Manual he refers to himself as "Sir Lothar". After "Sir" the knight's given name must be written, not his family name.

2) World of Warcraft - Tides of Darkness gives us the same treatment:

“Sir Lothar has brought with him others from his kingdom,” Terenas continued, “including some soldiers. While their numbers are not significant when compared to the threat we face, their experience in dealing with the orcs firsthand could be invaluable.

“I would tell you, Sir Lothar, that the Church has pledged itself to Stormwind’s aid. We shall gather funds to help you rebuild your kingdom, once the immediate crisis has passed.”

Once again, had it been the surname, he would be called "Sir Anduin".

3) World of Warcraft - Tides of Darkness has characters calling him "Lothar" with no title attached - which would be disrespectful to a noble had it been not his first name.

4) World of Warcraft - Tides of Darkness has an important plot point about Lothar being the last of Arathi bloodline. Let's see what that means:

“Finally, there is the question of his being a stranger.” Terenas smiled. “Though Lothar himself has not graced this continent with his presence before now, he is far from a stranger, for he has strong ties to this land and to our own kingdoms. For he is of the Arathi bloodline, indeed the last of their noble line, and thus has as much right to speak at this council as any of us!”

“The missive from King Terenas”—she nodded in his direction—“informed us that you, Lord Lothar, were the last of the Arathi bloodline. Our ancestors pledged eternal support to your King Thoradin and all his kin. Anasterian could not deny that obligation. He has sent this battle group to acknowledge the debt.”

Reading these, I think it is clearly that by "Arathi bloodline" it means Thoradin's dynasty.

But let's suppose it does not, and the "Arathi" in question is simply the reference to the whole Arathi Tribe. But Lothar is called "the last of the Arathi bloodline" - how would he be the only person with Arathi blood had the characters spoke about a whole tribe of humans? Wouldn't their many descendants still populate Stromgarde and the Arathi Highlands (all the Stromgarders can't be migrants from other regions, I think). Which would mean there is a whole lot of "Arathi descendants" and almost any Stromgarder could go and ask for Elven help.

I think that "Arathi" in this usage definitely refers to Thoradin's house, the royal dynasty, which leaves little place for "House Lothar".

5) "Lothar", by itself, is highly unusual for a family name, as it was a common given name once (especially for nobility). For its surname form, I'd expect something like... Lotharinger, von Lothringen etc.



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  #57  
Old 02-14-2014, 04:08 PM
Genesis Genesis is offline

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Originally Posted by ijffdrie View Post
Not particularly, as Dalar and Aran are also human names.
"Medivh" is Thalassian.

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Originally Posted by Kir the Wizard View Post
If you don't mind, I'd like to line up my reasons for why I don't think "Lothar" should be the family name. Mostly to send the link to Sean.
You should probably send him the counter-examples too, such as kings and other royals not following the proper order, such as King Greymane, etc..

Or this part in Tides of Darkness:
Quote:
“My name is Anduin Lothar,” the warrior answered, running a hand over his forehead. “I am—I was—the Knight Champion of Stormwind.”
Quote:
“Your Majesty,” Lothar replied, his deep voice carrying easily across the large room. He stopped several paces from the dais and bowed. “I am Anduin Lothar, a Knight of Stormwind. This is my companion, Khadgar of Dalaran.”
Quote:
“I present to you Anduin Lothar, Champion of Stormwind. He has come here as a messenger and more, perhaps a savior. I think it best if I let him tell you himself what he has seen and what we may expect soon ourselves.”
Quote:
We the kings of the Alliance do hereby appoint Lord Anduin Lothar, Champion of Stormwind, as our Supreme Commander!”
Quote:
This is Lord Anduin Lothar, Champion of Stormwind and Commander of the Alliance. And his companion, the wizard Khadgar of Dalaran.” Faol smiled. “I shall leave you six to discuss matters.”
Quote:
“Milady,” Lothar called out when she was still a few paces away. “Welcome. I am Anduin Lothar, commander of the Alliance of Lordaeron.”
Quote:
“Good.” The warrior nodded. “I am Anduin Lothar, former Knight of Stormwind and now commander of the Alliance forces.” He explained about the Horde, and about Stormwind’s fate. “Will you join us?”
Quote:
“Your commander, Anduin Lothar, sent word to us once before, asking for our participation in this Alliance,” Sylvanas stated, looking up at Turalyon.
Quote:
“Your Majesty,” the young man said, glancing up briefly and then away again. “I bring you greetings and a message from Lord Anduin Lothar, Commander of the Alliance.”
Quote:
Anduin Lothar raised his visor and glanced around, wiping grit and sweat from his eyes with the back of his hand as he idly drew his sword across the body of a fallen orc, cleaning the blade of the blood and gore that coated its length.
Quote:
Regent Lord Anduin Lothar, Champion of Stormwind and Commander of the Alliance, stood with sword raised and shield at the ready, looking to the skies as if daring them to battle.
So many formalities and introductions, yet anything Arathi-related is always conspicuously absent.

Last edited by Genesis; 02-14-2014 at 04:17 PM..
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  #58  
Old 02-14-2014, 10:41 PM
Millenia Millenia is offline

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Originally Posted by Kir the Wizard View Post
After "Sir" the knight's given name must be written, not his family name.
Considering Blizzard can't even logically link together A, B, and C, I highly doubt they're using any sort of style guide in their writing, especially with a concept as obscure to Americans as proper usage of names with titles.
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Because if a storyteller is doing his job, he makes you care. And if that storyteller then says "I dunno, then they stopped fighting, I guess," without any explanation or clarification, his audience has every right to be pissed off. Because they were given reason to stay interested, reason to keep up with his tale, only to be shut down just as things were getting good. A waste of time, a waste of emotional tension, a waste, if you fail to grasp the significance of narrative, of money.
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  #59  
Old 02-15-2014, 04:15 AM
Kir the Wizard Kir the Wizard is offline

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You should probably send him the counter-examples too, such as kings and other royals not following the proper order, such as King Greymane, etc..
I do want to tweet them on the "King Lastname" useage, but in a separate and more detailed (if not more provocational) tweet.

Although "King Lastname" can be used... Just not in the way it is used in TOD.

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Originally Posted by Genesis View Post
So many formalities and introductions, yet anything Arathi-related is always conspicuously absent.
Well, I did find the line about Lothar being the last of Thoradin's "Arathi bloodline", so I suppose that counts? And we haven't heard about Thoradin (or anyone, for that matter) being a member of the "House of Lothar" either.

And even if they are of such house, and "Arathi bloodline" means the Arathi tribe as whole... Than why wouldn't there be more descendants? Surely you agree that it would be impossible for Lothar to be the only man in the world with blood ties to the original human tribe? Thus, the wording must mean something else.

I'm not trying to say my interpretation is 100% correct. I just feel its less wrong with how the wording has been used since Warcraft 1.
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  #60  
Old 02-15-2014, 01:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Kir the Wizard View Post
I do want to tweet them on the "King Lastname" useage, but in a separate and more detailed (if not more provocational) tweet.

Although "King Lastname" can be used... Just not in the way it is used in TOD.
You are being too anal retentive about "proper usage" of titles in a fantasy game.

Quote:
And we haven't heard about Thoradin (or anyone, for that matter) being a member of the "House of Lothar" either.
Which is why I have always found the "Last of the Arathi" to be a STUPID contrivance. That is what made no logical sense and not somehow that Arathi was a surname of Anduin Lothar.

Quote:
And even if they are of such house, and "Arathi bloodline" means the Arathi tribe as whole... Than why wouldn't there be more descendants? Surely you agree that it would be impossible for Lothar to be the only man in the world with blood ties to the original human tribe? Thus, the wording must mean something else.
Arathi sounds more like an adjective or a plural form.

Quote:
I'm not trying to say my interpretation is 100% correct. I just feel its less wrong with how the wording has been used since Warcraft 1.
Since Warcraft 1? Since Warcraft 1, we've had lots of other examples that show consistency in inconsistency.
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  #61  
Old 02-15-2014, 04:06 PM
BaronGrackle BaronGrackle is offline

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Wouldn't the name be "Arathor" instead of "Arathi", anyway? If the name were connected to Lothar in some way?
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  #62  
Old 02-17-2014, 05:51 PM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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I'm with Kir, mostly because of the 'last of the arathi' thing making even less sense otherwise.

Anyway, while we're all jaunting in this thread, any feedback on the tauren tribes?
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  #63  
Old 03-02-2014, 08:09 AM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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Well, the feedback is apparently a cold, dead void of silence. Good to know. I'll add some more musical instruments and campfires.



Anyway, not posted in here for a while, since I'm ironing out the main questline. The main story is going to be the concept of the shadow war, a war between various underground organizations both recent and ancient, fighting for the fate of the barrens' new inhabitants. The player is thrown into this war when he is taken by demonic cultists, interested in a unique little affliction the player caught at mount hyjal. As more and more of the shadow war becomes known to the player, it will escalate further and further, until it breaks out in fullest. But who among the many underground factions is leading this war? Is it the black dragons of old? Those who worship the legion? Well-meaning extremists? Dark cultists? Maybe it's just the local smugglers, trying to make an extra coin? Or maybe someone entirely new?

Of course, that's only a vague description I cooked up at the moment, because I'm not done ironing out the entire thing yet. I've got most of the key parts of the story worked out though, and am actually rather proud of how well I worked out the schemes of the various underground organizations, especially the black dragonflight.



That aside, let's talk about cities for a little bit. I've said before that I'm a big believer in contrast, and that's something that does come through in the ideas of some of the cities.

Orgrimmar is probably the most notable example of this, with the traditionalistic shamans of the frostwolf clan and the mercantile industralists of the fireblossom clan living within the same city. The frostwolf exemplify the strengths of the traditional orcish way of life, with strong healthy warriors, champions directly empowered with the spirits, and allies of the very land on which they live. The fireblossom are those who have strayed the furthest from the traditional orcish way of life. Their time in Kezan has modernized and diversified them, with influences from goblin, troll and even human culture. They rely on alchemy and industry, preferring personal cleverness over unity with the land. Where the frostwolf keep to dry land, the fireblossom rely on the bounties of the sea.
Despite the sharp contrast, one of the main themes here is that neither side is inferior to the other. Both do things in their own ways.

The Crossroads also follows the idea of contrast. While traditionally a spring meeting place between three tauren, the bleeding hollow tribe has recently settled here and has started something incredibly radical: FARMING! Insert dramatic musical chord here. These orcs here are transferring to an agrarian society and serve as the breadbasket for the barrens.
Now, one big part of contrast is showing differences within similarities, so the orcish way of farming isn't exactly the same as you'd expect. The shamans of the bleeding hollow clan have made allies of the grains, with the grains choosing where to be planted and being offered protection in return for the food they provide.
Aside from being agrarian, they are also very heavily animal-reliant. Massive beast pens can be found throughout the city, home to various domesticated (vulture, giraffe, zhevra) and allied (wyvern, kodo, plainstrider) animals, providing the bleeding hollow with food an military strength. The difference between domestication and shamanistic bonding is showcased here, with the two groups treated very differently.
The tauren themselves are rather divided on this. The Thunderhorn like the protection offered by the bleeding hollow camp, but worry about their land being overtaken. The Skychaser see the bleeding hollow as compatriots because of their extensive bonds with animals, but do show some concern about the animals that are domesticated. And the Dawnchaser think this is all a great opportunity to preach about the sun to the orcs.

The Den is relatively small compared to the other towns. Unlike almost all other larger cities, it is not home to multiple factions. Instead, the contrast is between the above-ground portions of the city, an idyllic little community of hunters and burrow-keepers, and the under-ground portions of the city, a busy complex of metal-workers guided by earth-bound shamans.

Ratchet is the big city of traders and the only major city in the region to not be a recent construction. Here, you'll see and hear what the barrens were like before the arrival of the recent refugees. Ratchet is extremely diverse, with inhabitants from all sentient species in the barrens, and is where the player can get the perspectives of the actual natives.
Ratchet is also intended to be a big contrast to the rest of the cities. While for most people in the game, the settling in the barrens represent hope and a new beginning, the people of Ratchet only see their own position and way of life being threatened by new arrivals.

Onyxhold and Thunder Bluff are kind of in the same boat, showing members of a single race uniting in an effort to not only maintain, but revitalize their civilization.
Onyxhold is home to three dwarven clans that used to dedicate themselves to specialized trades in the city of Drisburg. The Firebrew were famed for producing their fire-spice mead, the Forgehand produced firearms for the Tirasian navy and the Sternbrow crafted fine works of metal to sell to the richest traders of Tiras. Now, these clans form the core of their new civilization, and are forced to adapt to new circumstances, and take on roles that they previously let the humans handle. And while they have some trouble, the dwarves here will prove that their time among the humans has not coddled them, and they can stand on their own. Onyxhold has only very recently been settled, and gives the player the opportunity to see first-hand how a new nation is formed in the barrens, and allows the player to do his own part in the foundation of that nation.
The situation in Thunder Bluff is much the opposite to the situation in Onyxhold. Previously, the tauren clans were almost entirely independent, able to rely on nothing but themselves. Now, they have been thrust together for strength in numbers. The Bloodhoof, proud hunters who seek to unite all tribes into a single nation. The Cloudsong, children of the sky who only seek to maintain their old ways. The Runetotem, keepers of lore who recently lost their home to the harpies. Like with the dwarves, the tauren provide the player with the opportunity to see the founding of a nation first-hand, with the player taking a personal role as the ambassador to the various tribes and trying to get them to join.

New Strahnbrad I already described with some detail. This is the place to show off a more low-fantasy environment, with classical humans and their enemies stuck in a setting which is decidedly non-classical.

Theramore is the final and biggest city of the region, and the definition of a political cluster-finnagle. It is home to no less than five different nations of refugees, each of which is still further divided onto itself. It is a mess of crime, hatred and political intrigue, but also a beacon of hope and cooperation. I already described the different sections of the city earlier on, so you have some idea of just how much the population of the city is divided.
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  #64  
Old 04-21-2014, 11:19 AM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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So I was reading through this thread again and stumbled upon the first war timeline and damn did I mess that up when I made the edits. I think I fixed it now, so that the twilight's hammer, frostwolf and dragonmaw are no longer hopping around time and space all willy-nilly
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Old 06-01-2014, 09:56 AM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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I decided to put a bit more thought into the Barrens natives, differentiate them a bit and give them a history. Made a map for the pre-refugee barrens as well. The positioning of the nomadic tauren camps is at the time when the first eastern refugees would have started arriving (You'll notice Camp Neheja's route past those three damn oases).

Anyway, native barrens inhabitants:

Kolkar Centaur
Among the many species that call the barrens home, none are more hated and feared than the Kolkar centaur. Originally from Desolace in the west, the Kolkar abandoned the eternal war over the valley of spears and instead turned their gaze eastward. In massive hordes, they descended upon the populace of the barrens, slaughtering and plundering their way across the great plains. This initial invasion took place over a thousand years ago, and the kolkar haven't left since.

Kolkar society is based around their packs, small communities that hunt and plunder across the barrens. Interaction between packs is minimal, and very few Kolkar will ever exchange more than a few words with those from other packs. Much more common is the exchange of violence between packs, as they compete for food or just fight to attain glory. However, stronger pack leaders, known as khans, will often force other packs into submission, forming so-called hordes. Though hardly united, these hordes are the driving force behind Kolkar conquests. Those who prove themselves during these conquests may even be given control of their own pack by their khan.

Thanks to their horse-like bodies, Kolkar are exceedingly swift and deadly in battle. Kolkar archers perform hit-and-run attacks, and are capable of accurately shooting while maintaining a steady pace, allowing them to stay out of reach of almost any enemy. Kolkar warriors, aptly dubbed 'impalers', will charge straight into enemy formations, using their weight and speed to drive their spears into enemies with unmatched force.

Supporting these deadly warriors are the deadly Kolkar sorcerers, taught their powers by runestones taken from the valley of spears centuries ago. The sorcerers are divided between three orders. Deathcallers are the masters of necromancy, infusing their brethren with unholy frenzy and calling their fallen comrades to do battle once more. Firecallers command ancient powers of flame and ash, unleashing gouts of fire upon any settlement unlucky enough to face centaur invasion. Stormseers wield the power of the skies, allowing them to see distant lands and call down gouts of winds and lightning upon any who face them.

The Kolkar are at war with almost every other faction in the barrens. The tauren have nearly been driven to extinction. The bristleback and Razormane have lost more than half their territories. The sacred valley of the harpies faces frequent incursions. Though the mirefin can escape beneath the ocean, their villages are not so lucky, and they are forced to reconstruct their settlements over and over and over. Even the Razorfen and Stonemaul, despite their distance from the centaur heartlands, face the occasional raid. Only the black dragons and steamwheedle goblins are safe from centaur raids, protected by their natural strength and advanced technology respectively.

Harpy Flocks
In screeching flocks they descend from the heavens, bearing with them howling winds and searing lightning. The land around you turns to chaos, as razor winds blind you. It's only when the battle fades that you see what you have lost. Your home is torn apart as the harpies took everything, even your family. You will never see them again.

For many, this is all they know of the harpies. They are bandits and rogues, taking everything that is not nailed down, even living beings. Men are taken to be mates. Women are taken to be feasted upon. Generally, the harpies keep to abducting quilboar, goblins and, less commonly, murlocs (due to not being physically compatible). Adult centaur and ogres are too heavy to carry, though the harpies will occasionally still attempt to take their children.

While most only know the harpies from their raids, they do have an actual homeland. In the northern end of the barrens, you will find seven tall mountains. Known to the harpies as the seven sisters, they, and the valley which they surround, form the sacred homeland of the harpies. Ancient runetotem scrolls tell of a beautiful frozen glade, guarded by serene priestesses, but if that was ever true, little remains. Today, the witchwing valley is a land of wild storms, drawn to the spiritual energies of the seven sisters. From these storms, the harpy wind-witches draw their magical power. The higher in rank, the more of the mountains the witches draw upon. Only the bloodfeathers, the seven high queens of harpy society, draw upon all the mountains, each bearing one of their names: Serena, Riven, Edana, Grenka, Rathtalon, Ahisha and Sirana.

The harpy flocks have a long-standing enmity with the goblins of Ratchet, the result of the latter taking in harpies that abandoned the worship of the seven sisters. Battles between the two groups are very frequent, though they usually end in favor of the steamwheedle cartel.

Razorfen quilboar
Ten thousand years ago, the god of the quilboar died. But with his death came a spark of new life. From his crystalline blood was born the razorfen, the sprawling mass of thorns found at the southern end of the field of giants. Through a long and bloody war, one tribe of quilboar managed to wrest control of their god's corpse from the other tribes, claiming it for themselves. From this act was born the razorfen tribe, a tribe of religious extremists that do everything in the name of their twisted vision of god.

Each Razorfen, from birth, is marked as a servant of Agamaggan. For most of them, this takes the form of a small red dot on the shoulder. Those who are deemed to carry the grace of the boar god are given more elaborate markings, which imbue the wielder with powerful blessings. The markings are made using a crystalline substance common in the razorfen region, believed to be the blood of the boar god. While the truth of this is debatable, it is obvious that it is a powerful magical substance. In addition to conveying blessings, it is used by quilboar geomancers as a component in their staffs, allowing them to drain the spirits of the earth.

Quilboar society is caste-based. The lowest caste is that of the servant, who take care of the menial jobs, such as building huts and gathering water. They are essentially slaves to the other castes and may be killed if they so much speak out of turn. The warrior caste is next, consisting of not only soldiers, but also hunters. The guardian caste consists of thornweavers and the quilguard, responsible for leading the defense of the razorfen homelands. The priestly caste, consisting of geomancers and boar handlers, fulfill leadership roles. The earthbreaker caste forms the nobility, wielding devastating powers of earth. While they also use geomancer staffs, earthbreaker don't draw upon mere earth spirits, but on the souls of the mountain giants that once roamed this region, driven to extinction by the razorfen in the war of sundered mountains. Finally, at the top of razorfen society stands the grand crone, the high lady of the razorfen, who rules from the skull of Agamaggan.

The razorfen are among the few natives in the barrens to engage in any degree of modern diplomacy, and have made several trade and passage agreements with the steamwheedle cartel. Razorfen borders are officially recognized by the goblins, and the trade prince and grand crone have been known to conduct official meetings in either territory.

Bristleback quilboar
In the aftermath of the sundering, the quilboar race descended into murder and anarchy. Brother turned on brother, tribe turned on tribe, nation turned on nation. Murderous chaos reigned the barrens, with only the few strongest tribes surviving. Some survived the war through clever tactics. Others through sheer, savage force. The bristleback are among the latter.

Normally, the body of any living being has limits. It can only stand so much pain. It can only exert so much strength. It can only work this long. For the quilboar, this is usually as true as it is for humans, goblins and orcs. Not so much for the bristleback though. In battle, their warriors inhale special herbs that allow them to far surpass their normal limits, although they lose their minds to an incredible bloodlust.

The bristleback are heavily patriarchal, with each of their villages under the command of an alpha male, a position inherited by the savaging, murdering and occasional eating of the previous alpha male. Women are seen as little more than property, and are forbidden from using the sacred herbs that give the bristleback their unholy strength.

Though the bristleback also draw power from the blood of Agamaggan, they are far less potent with it than the razorfen. Rather than sprouting massive thorns from the ground, most bristleback mystics, known as thorncallers, instead enervate existing thorn-vines, causing them to spring forth all sorts of rare and unique flowers. Most of these are necessary for the bristleback rage mixture, but a few serve other alchemical purposes.

Razormane quilboar
Not all those who live in the barrens have found their survival in savagery. The razormane are not only the smallest of the quilboar tribes, but they lack the sheer strength of the bristleback and the great magical power of the razorfen. Instead, they have embraced discipline and a form of wicked cleverness, which allow them to survive in even these harsh lands.

For a razormane, the life of an individual quilboar is valuable, only to be expended only when their homes are threatened and there is no other choice. Instead, the razormane make wide use of tamed animals. Coyote and boars serve as loyal pets, fighting alongside razormane pathfinders, while warfrenzies serve to drive packs of kodo and plainstrider into stampedes directed at the enemies. When the quilboar join the fray themselves, they prefer to do so at a range, unleashing volleys of primitive arrows upon their enemies. Melee combat is only engaged in when their villages are under direct attack, and they have no other choice. Leading in such situations are the battleguard. While most quilboar have duties placed upon them by the tribe, such as hunting, building or the communal rearing of the young, the battleguard are exempt from these duties, instead devoting their entire lives to the defense of their people.

Most feared, however, are the dustrunners. They are an all-female order of quilboar, gathered from the high chieftain's harem. They serve as the personal agents of the high chieftain, relaying his commands to the various villages, ensuring unity and stability of the tribe. In addition, they serve as his personal assassins, taking out threats both in- and outside the tribe. To do this, and to travel safely across the barrens, they have been blessed with the power of scorched sands. They are able to move like the wind, appear and disappear at a moment's notice, and have a degree of control over the sands around them.

The blessing of the dustrunners is the work of the razormane medicine men, the religious caste of the tribe. Led by the great spirit caller, they are able to call upon forgotten spirits from beneath the surface of this world. Through these ancient beings, they are able to restore wounds, bestow elemental blessings and call upon great powers in battle.

Mirefin Murloc
Though murlocs have only recently been sighted in the eastern kingdoms, they are ancient fixtures along the coasts of Kalimdor. The coasts of the barrens in particular are the domain of the mirefin tribe, a small tribe of nocturnal hunters. Though low in number, they are feared throughout the barrens. For when the nightcrawlers come, none are safe.

Even after many millennia, murloc culture remains something of an enigma. None have been able to translate anything more than the most basic of sentiments, and diplomacy with murlocs has thusfar proven impossible, despite innumerable attempts by the goblins to establish communication.

Through observation, a few things have however been learned. The mirefin seem to be caste-based, with scale and spike coloration changing depending on an individual's position. The oracles, easily recognized by their white scales and red spikes, seem to be worshiping various sea creatures, though the context in which they do so is unknown. Unlike most other natives of the barrens, mirefin villages are not known to engage in combat with one another.
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Old 06-28-2014, 02:01 AM
Kir the Wizard Kir the Wizard is offline

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Was Onyxhold built atop of the black dragon lair?
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Old 06-28-2014, 08:49 AM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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Was Onyxhold built atop of the black dragon lair?
Njet. Onyxhold lies beneath the field of giants. New Strahnbrad is located within the wyrmbog. Have the map updated to reflect the start of the game.

Note that the caves with the odd blue entrances aren't dragon lairs, but odd frozen caves like the Den of the Lost (one of the mini-dungeons from the warcraft III bonus campaign). The frostwolf kennels in Orgrimmar have been changed from Kirin Tor-made to one of these. They actually play a pretty big role storywise, but I'll get to that at some later point.

Speaking of the warcraft III bonus campaign, Monsoon Forest is also from there, being the weird mushroom forest from the stonemaul village map.
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Old 06-28-2014, 08:58 AM
Kir the Wizard Kir the Wizard is offline

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Might also add Mathog's Encampment. Or do you treat it as Razor Hill?
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Old 06-28-2014, 09:22 AM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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Might also add Mathog's Encampment. Or do you treat it as Razor Hill?
Mathogg's encampment was the original village of those fireblossom orcs that chose to rejoin the horde. However, as Old Hatreds says, Mathogg led his clan to Orgrimmar after Rexxar saved him, so the old encampment now lies abandoned. Instead, they have their own district within Orgrimmar now.
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Old 11-26-2015, 11:26 AM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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Oh hey, I had this thing, didn't I? I should probably get around to cleaning this thing up some day, removing the ideas that I realized in retrospect were terrible (Tirasian Tel Abim), work others out, and maybe rewrite some of the terribly written stuff.

Until then, since everyone has been posting their maps lately, I thought I'd dump some map WIPs as well. This is the big dang global map (zoomed out really, really far):



Kalimdor and the Eastern Kingdoms have their general map shapes from Warcraft III, Panda-land, Northrend and some assorted details from their WoW incarnations. As you can see, the detailing on the map is still a bit inconsistent (currently doing Ashenvale), though it should give a general idea.

It's a pre-warcraft I map, so no WC2/WC3-style lost isles (I'll probably end up splitting up the legion-style lost isles into seperate islands). Uldum retains canonicity, but is simply not visible yet.

The actual map file is truly humongous, taking the form of a massive GIMP file. If you want a closer look, here's the file. You'll note a lot of unnamed icons, which are there to give a general idea to what the region is filled with, or because we simply don't know names in the region yet.

A while back, Marthen did a meteorological map of the eastern kingdoms, which got me thinking about climate and such. I ended up making a (very crude) globe with equator to get a general idea of what the world as a whole looked like.



As you can see, I put the map at a slight angle. In addition, I assume that the Maelstrom is a source of massive warmth, plus some of the life-giving magic from the old well of eternity, accounting for the slightly warmer climate in northern regions (Quel'thalas is, of course, magic)

(Incidentally, does anyone have some better software for mapping continents onto a sphere? This one assumes one of your normal map projections, resulting in really squished poles, making Northrend really tiny, and parts of Lordaeron way too far north. I'd also appreciate something to generate good-looking island chains.)

While we're drawing planets anyway, let's talk about the solar system. Back in panda-land, there was a place called The Shrine of the Seven Stars. Given the etymology of the word planets (Planetai - wandering stars), I wondered if something similar wasn't going on in the world of Azeroth. Since there was nothing to contradict it, I assumed there to be seven detectable celestial objects aside from Azeroth's moons and the suns. I stuck with the naming scheme of Azeroth's moons for the rest of the planets.



Obviously, not to scale.
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Old 11-26-2015, 11:42 AM
Marthen Marthen is offline

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It seems we have the same idea regarding the placement of the equator south of the Cape of Stranglethorn and placement of Kalimdor further to the south. Anyway, very nice map.

PS: You are missing the island between Kul Tiras and Crestfall. Never in my life have I been so offended.
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Old 11-26-2015, 12:16 PM
Yaskaleh Yaskaleh is offline

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I've always been partial to placing the equator right through Stranglethorn Vale and Feralas. On Earth the equator passes through jungle-like environment on every continent.
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Old 11-26-2015, 12:21 PM
Marthen Marthen is offline

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I've always been partial to placing the equator right through Stranglethorn Vale and Feralas. On Earth the equator passes through jungle-like environment on every continent.
Have you seen my climatic map (the one I posted in my thread)? I based it on this exact idea, because honestly, it is the only way that one can make sense out of Azeroth other than "magic did it".
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Old 11-26-2015, 12:29 PM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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I've always been partial to placing the equator right through Stranglethorn Vale and Feralas. On Earth the equator passes through jungle-like environment on every continent.
It would make sense for the climate of Stranglethorn, but it would also put the vast bulk of Azeroth in the tropics.

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Old 11-26-2015, 12:45 PM
Marthen Marthen is offline

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It would make sense for the climate of Stranglethorn, but it would also put the vast bulk of Azeroth in the tropics.
It can be just south of the Cape (approx. 600 kilometers if Azeroth is of similar size as Earth). The climate would look somewhat like this.

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