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View Poll Results: Best alliance interpretation / worst alliance interpretation
Best: Dwarven Clans 3 30.00%
Best: Lordaeron 2 20.00%
Best: Alterac 2 20.00%
Best: Gilneas 2 20.00%
Best: Kul Tiras 2 20.00%
Best: High elves 5 50.00%
Best: Dalaran 3 30.00%
Best: Stromgarde 1 10.00%
Worst: Dwarven Clans 2 20.00%
Worst: Lordaeron 1 10.00%
Worst: Alterac 1 10.00%
Worst: Gilneas 2 20.00%
Worst: Kul Tiras 2 20.00%
Worst: High elves 1 10.00%
Worst: Dalaran 1 10.00%
Worst: Stromgarde 1 10.00%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 10. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-11-2013, 08:49 PM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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Default Ramses' take on warcraft.

I just had a few ideas for an alternate warcraft setting in my head. Unlike most threads of this kind, this isn't just an alternative to WoW. In fact, it eschews the MMO format completely. Instead, we're going to continue the world of azeroth after warcraft III as a single player RPG (or rather a series of them).

Four basic design goals:
1. Scope. The world of Azeroth should feel like a true, fully inhabited planet, not just the theme-park version it has frequently been watered down to.
2. Diversity. Again, it's a frigging planet. There should be hundreds of varied cultures, sub-cultures and cultural movements sweeping the planet on any given day.
3. Consistency. In the past, warcraft products haven't exactly been the most consistent. In fact, they make the ministry of truth look like amateurs. One of our first goals is to create a fully consistent timeline for the previous games, establish just what is canon and what isn't canon, and then stick to it.
4. Being a good sequel to the previous warcraft games.

Okay, enough intro. Let's get to the important parts. The first game in the series takes place where the last game in the RTS series ended: Central Kalimdor. So, what has everyone been up to? Well, lets start with a couple of members of the alliance, and add more later, shall we?

Central Kalimdor (a.k.a. The barrens)
It's been one year since the death of Daelin Proudmoore, and a (tense) peace has returned to the region. Unaware of the continued scourge threat that remains in the east, the new horde and the alliance expedition have turned their attention to building a new life on this strange new continent. In this endeavor, they are aided by many of the local tauren tribes as well as the steamwheedle cartel. Together, these forces are united in the pact of mount hyjal (the night elves were also invited, but they refused).

Of course, not everything has been going their way (since we need a game ). While the various factions are close allies at the higher levels of government, the subjects of those governments don't necessarily agree with their leaders. Already, several violent groups have struck against the other faction, intent on restarting the war.

Of course, it's not just internal threats that are a problem. The environment of The Barrens has proven particularly harsh, with massive heat and dangerous animals. Quilboar, centaur, harpies, murlocs and some of the more aggressive tauren tribes remain a constant threat to the fledgling nations. In addition, there's recently been numerous reports of increased black dragon activity.

The Alliance Expedition
Expanded Backstory
In the late summer of the year 630, after the razing of Stratholme, Jaina Proudmoore was contacted by a mysterious stranger, known (at the time) only as 'the prophet'. Though the mysterious prophet had already given his warning to many other high-ranking members of the alliance, Jaina was the first who took action based on his words. Using her personal political clout, she managed to gather a small fleet off the coast of Silverpine. As a daughter of the proudmoore family, she managed to acquire the assistance of a large portion of the Kul Tiras elite core, including the famed Knights of the Crimson Wave. The allies she had made in her time at the court of Lordaeron allowed her to gather a small corps of elite Lordaeronian soldiers as well. Her connections as personal student of Antonidas also gave her clout with the archmages of Dalaran, and she recruited a number of mages from the Kirin Tor, the Mages' guild, the sorcerer's league and even the silver covenant. Though Uther disagreed with her plan, his personal friendship with her made him still pass on her request to his fellow paladins, a few of which chose to join the expedition. Even Crowley, one of the members of the gilnean house of lords, sent Jaina some soldiers, though it was mostly an effort to piss of his king.

Finally, Jaina Proudmoore had gathered her fleet. 10 battleships, a good 3000 soldiers between them. The expedition was only waiting for the last few supplies to arrive when dire tidings arrived: Lordaeron city had fallen, destroyed by the undead. Thousands of refugees, hearing stories of an expedition that would travel to a mythic land safe from the undead, sought out the expedition, seeking to join. Duke Lionheart, one of the highest-ranking surviving nobles of Lordaeron, commandeered the remaining fleets of his kingdom and joined the expedition to bring the refugees to a safe haven. Refugees from Alterac, the next nation targeted by the scourge, also started flooding in, along with lesser amounts of refugees from Stromgarde, Dalaran, Gilneas and even several dwarven clans, fearing their lands might be next.

Gathering more supplies in Boralus, they were naturally also joined by many refugees from Jaina's own country. More surprisingly, there was also a large group of high elves from the outer regions of Quel'thalas, having taken the fleet from Windrunner Spire to escape the scourge onslaught. What started out as a simple expedition had turned into a true exodus at this point, carrying many thousands upon thousands across the ocean, to the lost lands of Kalimdor.

The **** are they up to now?
Over the past year, the alliance expedition has been attempting to contact the eastern kingdoms, to see if there are any survivors. Thusfar, all attempts at contacting the EK have failed, and the reports given by the remnants of Daelin's forces painted a grim enough picture that extinction of at least Lordaeron, and probably also Khaz Modan, has been deemed probable. The expedition members now see themselves as the last remnants of their respective civilizations, and are determined to rebuild.

Alterac
Expanded Backstory
The fourth of the seven modern human kingdoms to be established, Alterac was established by a group of rogue nobles, seeking independence from the strict laws and customs of the league of arathor. As their new homeland, they chose the harsh Alterac mountain-range, after which they named their kingdom. Arathor naturally wasn't too happy about the runaway nobles, and sent an army to take them back in. Called 'the founding war', it quickly taught the rest of the world one simple thing: conquering alterac is a suicide mission.

In the twelve years it took to organize the arathor offensive, the people of Alterac had gotten acquainted with their new homeland. They had constructed their fortresses high in the mountains, raining down rocks and boiling oil on the hapless arathor legions. They had mapped many of the maze-like valleys, using their knowledge to launch ambushes. For every soldier killed on the side of Alterac, as many as thirty soldiers fell on the side of Arathor. Battered and broken, the arathor legions retreated.

The lords of Alterac quickly got a reputation as robber barons, getting rich off the many caravans that passed through their lands. Naturally, this didn't exactly do wonders for their diplomatic relations, but who cared? It's not like the other kingdoms could actually do anything. By this point, the strength of Alterac came from more than just the tactical advantages of its terrain.
Not trusting the wizards of Dalaran, the lords of Alterac instead employed self-trained hedge mages, who quickly developed a community of their own. While not nearly as powerful as their counterparts in Dalaran, they had developed a number of simple but effective non-combat spells, as well as an impressive knowledge of alchemy. Elixirs of strength in particular were used to equip single soldiers, called bulwarks, with armor so heavy it would put a knight to shame.
The people of alterac were also much more practical (or, some would argue, nasty) when it came to warfare. Rather than having extensive traditions and stories of honorable battle, they would simply go for what worked best. Swords (which take a lot of metal to make, and need a lot more time to maintain) are eschewed as direct weapons in favor of maces and axes. Polearms, rarely seen in the other human nations, are used extensively, and in a great variety. Similarly, crossbows are used extensively, nearly completely replacing the long- and short-bows favored by other humans.
Finally, alterac is very well-known for having the best human blacksmiths on the planet, a result of living in the iron and thorium-rich alterac mountains. Alterac was one of the nations to first establish contact with the dwarves of Khaz Modan, and the two kingdoms exchanged several smithing secrets.

For several hundred years, the situation in Alterac remained relatively static. While there were tons of minor conflicts between lords of Alterac, as well as with the other nations, there were no major wars. Even the secession wars passed by nearly unnoticed. It was only with the coming of the horde that the status quo was sufficiently rustled. As shown during the battles in Khaz Modan, the orcs had far less trouble fighting in the cold mountains then the humans did. In addition, they could use goblin zeppelins to easily bypass difficult terrain. Without the advantages of their terrain, Alterac was by far the weakest of the human nations (mountain ranges tend to not have enough food to support large populations), and King Perenolde feared that his country would simply be overrun by the orcish hordes. In the year 604, he made the decision to let the horde forces pass through his country unopposed. Though he tried to keep this secret, the high lords of the alliance found out and branded him a traitor. Though a full-scale invasion of Alterac was still considered madness, the alliance had enough mountain-capable and flying forces to execute a single decisive strike against Alterac City, killing Perenolde and formally ending the nation of Alterac, integrating it into Lordaeron

Of course, that was just formally. Many nobles didn't take the regime change well, uniting together to form The Syndicate, acting as bandits/freedom fighters (depending on who you ask) and fighting any presence of Lordaeron. One band of the syndicate, the bloodhill bandits, even crossed blades with prince Arthas. But there was little hope for success in the ways of the syndicate. When the scourge attacked the alterac mountains, vast portions of the syndicate fled, along with many civilians from the mountain range.

The **** are they up to now?
The exodus has granted them a second chance. Standing at the battle of mount hyjal, and helping save the very planet, has mended relations to a large degree (though some would argue that it's more that the other nations are too busy with their own stuff), and alterac is now accepted as a full-fledged nation in the alliance of Theramore, represented on the council by king Isiden Perenolde. Like the dwarves, they abandoned the safety of the city to seek their own destiny, founding the city of New Strahnbrad at the southern edge of the Wyrmbog.

Alterac is notable as one of the few nations in the alliance of Theramore without a notable or influential anti-horde movement. After all, more people from Alterac died at the hands of fellow humans then died at the hands of the orcs. In addition, the people of alterac weren't present for the battle of Theramore, avoiding the renewed hatreds against orcs and ogres, or the new hatreds against the tauren. That last one in particular is important, as there is extensive trade between the nation of alterac and the stonehoof and ragetotem tribes of tauren, and the nation of alterac has employed several tauren trackers to learn the lay of this new land.

That's not to say that the nation of alterac is without troubles though. Let's just say that the wyrmbog is named that way for a reason. A black-scaled, fire-breathing, undead-commanding reason...

Design notes
The goal for the nation of Alterac is to be a more realistic portrayal of a medieval nation, compared to the heavily idealized portrayals of the other nations. Flashy magic is downplayed, turning the nation into more of a low-fantasy environment.

Dwarven refugee clans
Expanded backstory
From the start of dwarven civilization, there's been a single, very consistent problem: Overpopulation. Underground cities tend to take a lot of time to expand, and food tends to be hard to come by in the cold mountain ranges, resulting in populations that have nowhere to sleep and nothing to eat. As a result, the early days of dwarven civilization were marred with wars between various clans, determined to make sure that their kids weren't the ones that were going to starve in the cold.

However, in the year 1313 BSW, something happened that would change dwarven history: First contact with humanity. The human kingdoms of alterac and gilneas had launched an expedition into Dun Morogh, looking for rare metals. It was ambassadors from these two kingdoms that first entered the city of Ironforge, followed by an exchange of gifts.

For the gilneans, the exchange was one of knowledge. They learned the secrets of extracting the chemicals necessary to create gunpowder from oil, in return offering the schematics for the printing press and the construction of vessels. But for the people of alterac, the exchange was different. They gave the dwarves a piece of land in their home mountain range, in return asking that the dwarves that went there would teach them.

As you can imagine, not many dwarves were eager to leave their homeland behind. However, one clan, weakened and starving, eventually accepted. They were the stormpike clan. Traveling to the continent of Lordaeron, they constructed a small city in a remote valley of the alterac mountains. There, they traded their metal masterpieces for food and other products produced by the humans.

Within a hundred years, the stormpikes had become one of the richest and most powerful dwarven clans, exceeded only by the big three clans of Ironforge. As you can imagine, other clans quickly followed suit, making deals with the various human nations. The terms were simple. The humans would give a dwarven clan a small patch of land to build their city on. They would make sure that the dwarves could always buy food from the people of their nation. In return, the dwarves gave the humans access to the finest dwarven masterpieces, and assistance during times of war.

When the scourge came, several clans chose to join the expedition, and now live on Kalimdor.

The **** are they up to now?
There's currently six dwarven clans in the alliance of Theramore: Stormpike, Twinbraid, Stormbrand, Forgehand, Firebrew and Sternbrow.

The stormpike clan has continued its association with the kingdom of Alterac, and currently lives in New Strahnbrad. Firebrew, Stormbrand and Sternbrow, originally from the island of Tiras, have constructed a large new dwarven city called Onyxhold in the field of giants, which is the considered the dwarven capital by the clans of Kalimdor (who deem it likely that Ironforge has fallen), and thus representatives from each clan can be found there. Twinbraid, originally from Lordaeron, is the only clan to remain in Theramore, occupying the quarter of Dun Barok. Forgehand, originally from Lordaeron and the smallest clan present, has built a small town at the border between Dustwallow Marsh and the Wyrmbog, all the trade between Onyxhold, New Strahnbrad and Theramore passing through it.

Design notes
Okay, I'll admit it. I wrote these guys solely to explain where all the random dwarven soldiers in warcraft III came from.

High elves
Expanded backstory
For thousands of years, there's been a large cultural divide within Quel'thalas between the people of Silvermoon and the people of Eversong.

Silvermoon was the home of the great elven cities, massive wondrous metropolises of unmatched luxury. Home to the sunwell, and the thousands of magisters that guided its great power, every elf in silvermoon lived a life of luxury that would make even most kings jealous. Massive elven legions of spellbreakers, astromancers, retainers, arcane constructs, sunblades, shadowswords, hawkriders and dozens of other disciplines kept the order within the great cities and kept out any non-elf who would dare enter.

Eversong was the great enchanted forest of the elves, where magic and nature flowed together as one. Shaped by the great high elf druids, it was a place where elf and nature could live in a harmonious, symbiotic relationship. Order was kept by squadrons of farstriders and rangers, bonded to the very earth, and the church of the morning sun, as well as the protection granted by the ancient runestones.

Over time, as the people of Silvermoon grew more reclusive, the people of Eversong grew closer to other allies. They grew especially close to the wildhammer dwarves, but also became close allies of Dalaran and maintained some friendly relationships with Lordaeron and Stromgarde. During the second war, the farstriders actually joined with the greater alliance armies, while the legions of Silvermoon kept to themselves. In the third war, they didn't even wait for silvermoon to officially rejoin the alliance to send people to aid the ailing lands of Lordaeron and protect its inhabitants.

What no one expected though, was for the scourge to suddenly strike directly against Quel'thalas. Somehow, they knew how to break through the elfgates and were able to disable the runestones, making a direct strike against Silvermoon, taking control of the sunwell. Within a single week, half of the elven race had been killed. Within a month, it was up to 90%.

Amongst the few survivors was a large group of people from eversong. With the aid of the farstriders and a few druids, they were successful in storming windrunner spire, retaking it from the scourge. From there, they took the remains of the eversong fleet to Drisburg, hoping that Kul Tiras had not yet been attacked by the scourge. When they arrived, Jaina Proudmoore's fleet of refugees was also docked there, gathering supplies for the long trip to Kalimdor.

In addition to the high elves that took the fleet from windrunner spire, a few other elves had also joined the expedition. This includes mages of Dalaran that had been recruited by Jaina, a few farstriders that were aiding the people of Lordaeron and several travelling priests of the morning sun.

The **** are they up to now?
Nearly all the expedition high elves live inside Theramore City, in the elf-created Silver Gardens district. Here, they do their best at crafting a new Eversong. Like the blood elves did in the eastern kingdoms, the theramore elves are suffering from withdrawal due to the corruption of the sunwell, though not nearly to the same degree. Mostly, this is because the people of Eversong were less attuned to the energies of the sunwell.

Within Theramore, withdrawal is no longer a problem due to the druids crafting a new runestone. It doesn't give the elves access to the same magics as before, but its enough to serve as a fix to those who remain in close proximity. Elves who leave Theramore start suffering physical and mental problems within only a few days. The druids are currently working on creating additional runestones, with the one in Northwatch nearing completion.

For the sake of the pact of mount hyjal, this is a very good thing. The high elves (especially those from Eversong) hate the orcs more than any other group on the continent. Even with the withdrawal symptoms, the high elves are already over-represented in violent anti-horde organizations.

The high elves are represented on the council of Theramore by Renthar Hawkspear, who was the leader of the farstrider forces that took control of Windrunner Spire. The new council of six also includes a high elf (at least, that's what people think) by the name of Krasus.

Design notes
I think this does a pretty good job at allowing the blood elves and high elves to maintain a separate culture, while remaining accurate to the portrayal of the high elves in both warcraft II and III. Go Ramses! *happy dance*



Things that you will see added later: The gilnean slums, the flowerpicker clan, tauren tribes that have actual different cultures, black dragons with a plan and an actual main plot.
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Old 08-12-2013, 10:14 AM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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Ah, completely forgot the timeline.
  • -6,301: The high elves found the kingdom of Quel'thalas.
  • -4,122: The dwarves successfully conquer Dun Morogh from the frostmane empire. They start construction on the city of Ironforge.
  • -2,406: Arathor unites the last of the human tribes of Lordaeron into the nation of Arathor and founds the city of Strom.
  • -2,338: The various forest troll tribes are united by the great warlord Kaz'jin, who promises the reconquest of Quel'thalas in return for the zandalari blessing his rule. Tens of thousands of trolls lay siege to Quel'thalas
  • -2,335: King Anasterian Sunstrider asks the people of Arathor for aid, in return promising to teach them the secrets of magic.
  • -2,332: Kaz'jin is slain.
  • -2,289: Over time, the elf-trained magi have trained many more human magi, who establish the city-state of Dalaran.
  • -2,243: Count William Greymane rebels against the restrictive policies of Stromgarde. Inspired by freedom found in Dalaran, he took his followers to a distant peninsula, and claimed it as the city-state of Gilneas. Gilneas remained loyal to the empire of Arathor.
  • -1,937: A group of rogue nobles establish the kingdom of Alterac. Unlike the earlier Gilneas, these nobles reject the empire of Arathor.
  • -1,925: High King Derek has gathered a massive army to invade the kingdom of Alterac and claim it for the empire. Start of the founding war.
  • -1,922: The legions of Arathor are forced into retreat due to massive losses. End of the founding war.
  • -1,313: A joint gilnean and alteracian expedition makes first contact with the dwarves of Ironforge
  • -883: The city of Boralus is established by the rich proudmoore family.
  • -799: Having become a rich trading empire, the proudmoore family declares itself the rulers of a new city-state, claiming the island of Tiras. The sehanchi and jahaad people also join the nation of Tiras in return for protection.
  • -721: A group of nobles petition High King Noram to move the capital of the empire to Lordaeron. Noram, a (justifiably) paranoid man, refused, seeing this as an attempt to get him away from the safety he had built in Stromgarde. Despite his refusal, several of his highest-ranking nobles still moved to Lordaeron. Noram, seeing this as the start of a coup (which wasn't all that unlikely. The nobles really hated Noram), fled, taking his most loyal servants to the most distant place he could imagine: Elwynn Forest. Here, he founded Stormwind Keep, ruling his empire through messengers. The lords of Lordaeron were fine with this, claiming their new lands as a seperate city-state within the empire.
  • -711: Noram passes away, replaced by his younger brother Derek III. Derek expands Stormwind Keep into a true city, later starting the colonization the surrounding regions. Derek declared these regions the high kingdom of Azeroth.
  • -639: First sighting of a gnome
  • -602: Start of the great trade war between Kul Tiras and Kezan.
  • -571: The last goblin trade king is killed by a Tirasian raid. There is no successor, with control over Kezan instead taken by the five trade princes and their cartels.
  • -34: Start of the secession war
  • 0: End of the secession war
  • 352: Start of the war of the three hammers
  • 365: End of the war of the three hammers
  • 422: Gnomeregan is established.
  • 471: Start of the second great trade war
  • 475: End of the second great trade war. Goblin trade princes institute a policy of absolute neutrality
  • 571: The great and powerful Medivh reaches the age of ascension. Due to demonic influences, he bursts forth with wild power. It took the combined efforts of the court conjurer and a hundred clerics of the order of Saint Seraph to try and suppress his budding power. However, before he is subdued, Medivh creates an errant crack in the fabric of reality.
  • 576: The Shadow Council manages to send a single orc through the crack.
  • 583: The orcs directly assault Stormwind City killing king Adamant Wrynn III, starting the first war.
  • 587: The blackrock clan of orcs discovers a mountain called blackrock mountain. Seeing this as a sign of the spirits, they assault the dark iron dwarves that live there.
  • 593: The blackrock clan, with aid from the dragonmaw clan, manages to take control of the upper half of blackrock mountain. Zuluhed recovers a mystical artifact known as the demon soul from the dark iron vaults.
  • 594: Blackhand ascends to become the first warchief of the orcish hordes.
  • 595: Nekros Skullcrusher, having been given the demon soul by Zuluhed, uses it to subdue the dragon queen Alexstrasza.
  • 598: In a devastating offensive, Blackhand crushes the kingdom of Azeroth, ending the first war. He himself does not live to see his final victory, having been killed and replaced by Orgrim Doomhammer.
  • 602: The horde starts its assault upon Lordaeron, starting the second war.
  • 605: The Stomreaver and Twilight's Hammer clans betray the horde to claim the Tomb of Sargeras. Warchief Doomhammer sends an expedition to destroy the clans. However, this leaves him weakened, and results in a failed assault upon the city of Lordaeron. The alliance takes advantage of this weakness, defeating the horde in a series of devastating battles. First, the battle of Blackrock Mountain results in the defeat of the blackrock clan. A few months later, the battle of the Dark Portal did the same for the burning blade clan. Finally, the battle of Grim Batol resulted in the defeat of the dragonmaw clan. Only the bleeding hollow clan and black tooth grin manage to escape, the latter having fled through the dark portal at the battle of the dark portal. The second war ends
  • 606: The dark portal is reopened, the bleeding hollow clan retreating. Shortly afterwards, expeditions from the remaining orcish clans of outland struck against strategic locations on Azeroth, seeking to claim several artifacts. The alliance organizes a counter-expedition to retrieve the artifacts and deal with the orcs on Draenor.
  • 607: The dark portal is destroyed.
  • 621: A young orc by the name of Thrall starts a campaign to free the imprisoned orcs. Start of the third war
  • 623: A plague grips the lands of Lordaeron, and the dead start walking around. Fo'shizzle goes down.
  • 624: The battle of Mount Hyjal. End of the third war


Alas, I don't get everything right the first time. Shameful edits list:
Edit 1: Shortened the period between the forming of the empire of arathor and anasterian asking Thoradin for aid. Previously, Thoradin needed to be two hundred years old for this to be possible.
Edit 2: Seperated the death of Kaz'jin and the founding of Dalaran by a hefty amount of years because I originally forgot that the elves only trained a hundred magi, which is hardly enough to found a kingdom.
Edit 3: Renamed many of the early appearances of human kingdoms into city-states.
Edit 4: Removed the war naming conventions (which, as MisterCrow pointed out, were kinda pointless)
Edit 5: Moved up the warcraft III events a little to fit with the ages of the various characters. Not sure why I even had it so far back. I think I miscalculated 607+13 as having been 630. Timeline's been fixed. Thrall should now be 24 during Warcraft III, been a baby during the meeting between Orgrim and Durotan (599) and there's been nearly thirteen years of peace between BtDP and III (assuming things took a little while to cool down)
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Old 08-29-2013, 07:10 AM
Kir the Wizard Kir the Wizard is offline

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I can't believe I missed this. Awesome job, Ramses.
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Old 09-08-2013, 11:28 AM
Yaskaleh Yaskaleh is offline

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We need more, mr ramses.
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Old 09-08-2013, 03:09 PM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yaskaleh View Post
We need more, mr ramses.
Working on it. Almost done with writing the rest of the alliance factions in Theramore as well as the organizations that reject Theramore and continue the war against the horde, and have been working out some ideas to make the steamwheedle cartel into a more developed faction. The horde is still something I'm working on, working out hooks for all of the clans and tribes.

Plus, I'm writing down bits for detailed histories of the "true" events of the previous warcraft games (basically, which missions are canon, how they happened, etc.), different weapon styles for the different factions and a lot of stuff on architecture

Also, I got the main plot down, though still working out some details. It's got dreadlords, black dragons, red herrings and at least two big battles. Won't post the main plot until I've worked out all the other details, but I will give you one of the questions I've tried to answer: "In the middle of the war with the scourge, his nation risking extinction on a daily basis, Lord-Admiral Daelin Proudmoore took a massive fleet to Kalimdor just to hunt down some orcs who'd vanished months ago. Why did that response take so long, and why the priority?"
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Old 09-09-2013, 03:56 PM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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More typework than I expected it to be.


Stromgarde
Expanded backstory (also includes that of humanity in general)
The tribal days
In ancient times, humanity was divided between dozens of small tribes, spread over the lands we now know as Lordaeron. Some tribes were nothing but cave-dwellers, while others constructed primitive villages. There were even some tribes with writing, with stone tablets surviving to this day and giving us modern people a view what life was like in these ancient times. Long story short: it sucked. Most of the northern forests were dominated by ancient troll temple cities, with hunting parties always looking for fresh human sacrifices. The southern plains were ruled by massive gnoll hunting packs that slaughtered anything in their way. The mountains that separated the forests and plains weren't much better, with yetis and kobolds infesting every nook and cranny.

However, that changed with the arathi. A small tribe of humans, led by the young chieftain Thoradin, who had killed his half-brother to gain this title for himself. There is very little archaeological data on the arathi prior to the birth of Thoradin, mostly from their old cave paintings near the southern-most tip of Lordaeron. No villages, no forged metal, no writings. Hell, even their cave paintings were much less detailed than the other tribes.

And yet, with Thoradin, this all changed. Legends speak of him being some sort of oracle, gaining knowledge from the very earth. He brought his tribe to the modern Stromgarde, constructing the first version of what is still known as the grey keep. Within a single generation, the arathi had gained knowledge of metallurgy, horse taming, archery, mining, agriculture and military tactics.

The tribes of early humanity raided each other's settlements with some regularity. After all, there was only so much land available that was safe from the (other) savages, and it usually wasn't very good land. However, while such raids would allow single tribes to survive for just a little while longer, they kept the species as a whole weak. One single powerful enemy could wipe out the entire species if he so desired.

And a candidate for that role appeared; Kaz'jin, a mighty forest troll warlord that sought to reconquer the whole of Lordaeron to restore the ancient empire of his people. While the bulk of his forces were engaged in battle with the elves to the north, several small warbands of trolls also laid siege to gnoll and human territories. Thoradin, recognized the growing threat as one too great to ignore. His people needed to form a united front against the trolls.

Over the course of six years, the cunning arathi outmanuevred and outfought their rival tribes. After every victory, the Arathi offered peace and equality to the conquered people, as well as a save place to live in the arathi lands; thus, they won the loyalty of those they had beaten. As the arathi grew in strength, some tribes even joined voluntarily. With more and more tribes traveling to the arathi lands, the grey citadel grew into a true city, the first human metropolis of Strom. The nation of Arathor had been born, with Thoradin as its first high king.
The kingdom of Arathor
Though humanity was united in name, it was still divided in spirit. Each of the tribes had maintained their own culture prior to being assimilated into the arathi, and they weren't just going to drop that overnight because some high king told them to. Fights in the streets of Stromgarde were incredibly common due to this, and were inflicting a rather heavy toll. To wash away this old order, Thoradin argued, a new one was needed.

At the top of the new system were the nobles, presided over by him. The few remaining leaders of the old tribe system along with those who had proven themselves to Thoradin during his campaign were given titles and land, organized in a feudal system. These nobles would all spend at least two months of every year at the court in Strom, where they would be educated by the finest human minds Thoradin agreed with.

Below the nobles were the courtiers, who served the state in all manners that a normal citizen could not. They were administrators, priests, magistrates, agents and commanders in the army. Like the nobles, they were educated at the court of Strom, though that education went into more specific fields than that of the nobles.

The vast majority of the population was commoners. Simple, uneducated folks that worked the fields, practiced simple crafts and manned the army. To control them, Thoradin instituted an extensive and harsh system of laws. To unify them, Thoradin instituted the holy light as a state religion, banning any others. (fun factoid: last names and monogamy stem from Thoradin's reforms)

Finally, there were the slaves. Remnants of the old tribes that refused to surrender, criminals and heathens were hunted down and put to work performing back-breaking labor on Thoradin's building projects. The most famous of these was Thoradin's wall, a massive defensive structure built to keep the gnoll hunting packs from even entering human territory.

Thoradin knew that the mysterious elves in the northlands were under constant siege by the trolls, but refused to risk the safety of his people in defense of reclusive strangers. Years passed as rumors of the elves' supposed defeat trickled down from the north. It was only when weary ambassadors from Quel'Thalas reached Strom that Thoradin realized how great the troll threat truly was.

The elves informed Thoradin that the troll armies were vast and that once the trolls had destroyed Quel'Thalas, they would move on to attack the southlands. The desperate elves, in dire need of military aid, hastily agreed to teach certain select humans to wield arcane magic in exchange for their help against the warbands. Thoradin, distrustful of the any magic but that of his own people, agreed to aid the elves out of necessity. Almost immediately, elven sorcerers arrived in Arathor and began to instruct a group of humans in the ways of magic.

The elves found that although humans were innately clumsy in their handling of magic, they possessed a startling natural affinity for it. One hundred men were taught the very basics of the elves' magical secrets: no more than was absolutely necessary to combat the trolls. Convinced that their human students were ready to aid in the struggle, the elves left Strom and traveled north alongside the mighty armies of King Thoradin.

The united elf and human armies clashed against the overwhelming troll warbands at the foot of the Alterac Mountains. The battle lasted for many days, but the unflagging armies of Arathor never tired or gave an inch of ground before the troll onslaught. The elven lords deemed that the time had come to release the powers of their magic upon the enemy. The hundred human magi and a multitude of elven sorcerers called down the fury of the heavens and set the troll armies ablaze. The elemental fires prevented the trolls from regenerating their wounds and burned their tortured forms from the inside out.

As the troll armies broke and attempted to flee, Thoradin's armies ran them down and slaughtered every last one of their soldiers. The trolls would never fully recover from their defeat, and history would never see the trolls rise as one nation again. Assured that Quel'Thalas was saved from destruction, the elves made a pledge of loyalty and friendship to the nation of Arathor and to the bloodline of Thoradin. Humans and elves would maintain peaceful relations for ages to come.
The empire of Arathor
With the absence of trolls in the northlands, the elves of Quel'Thalas bent their efforts towards rebuilding their glorious homeland. The victorious armies of Arathor returned home to southlands of Strom. The human society of Arathor grew and prospered, yet Thoradin, fearful that his people would again splinter if they were to overextend, maintained that Strom was the center of the Arathorian empire. After many peaceful years of growth and commerce, mighty Thoradin died of old age, leaving Arathor's younger generation free to expand the empire beyond Thoradin's great wall.

The original hundred magi, who were tutored in the ways of magic by the elves, expanded their powers and studied the mystic disciplines of spell-weaving in much greater detail. They developed their own brand of mystical arts, passing them down to a new generation. Wielding their mystical powers, the magicians protected their brethren from the wild creatures of the land, particularly the ever-present gnolls, and made it possible for new city-states to be constructed in the wilderness. Yet, as their powers grew, the magicians became ever more conceited and isolated from the rest of society.

The second arathorian city-state of Dalaran was founded in the lands north-west of Strom. Because Thoradin had imposed many laws restricting experimentation with magic, many fledgling wizards left their old homeland behind, hoping to use their powers with greater freedom in Dalaran. Needless to say, High King Freyson, son of Thoradin, wasn't too happy about a bunch of mages declaring themselves independent so they could go mess with reality.

Within a few weeks, the city of Dalaran had been surrounded by the armies of Arathor. The mages, confident (arguably overconfident) in their abilities, did not back down against the armies that stood before them. Would Freyson attack, there would be a bloodbath the likes of which humanity had never seen. However, rather than attacking, Freyson maintained the siege and instead called in an old debt. Within a week, a few dozen magisters from Silvermoon appeared to stand alongside the armies of Strom. Faced with opposition that could match their own powers, the wizards of Dalaran agreed to negotiate with Freyson. As long as the city-state of Dalaran kept answering and paying taxes to the throne of the high king and did not expand their lands, they would be given a large measure of self-governance, acting as their own state within the greater empire.

In the centuries that passed, Strom continued to act as the central hub of Arathor, but as with Dalaran, many new city-states arose across the continent of Lordaeron. Gilneas, Southshore, Stratholme, Hearthglen, Boralus, Tyr's Hand, Caer Darrow, Fenris, Andorhal, Tirisfal and Tol Barad all had their own customs and commercial workings, but remained loyal to the high crown (there was also alterac, but those guys told the high crown to go screw itself). At least, in name. For as the centuries passed, many of these states began to act more and more independently. Boralus and Gilneas were particularly guilty of this, massively extending themselves until they each controlled as much territory as Strom itself.

At the court in Strom, a large league of Arathor nobles petitioned high king Noram that they should move the capital to a more central location, proposing the fertile lands between Andorhal, Tirisfal and Fenris. Noram, was a very paranoid man, though not unjustifiably so. He saw this as an attempt to get him away from the safety he had built in Stromgarde in order to assassinate him (which wasn't all that unlikely. The nobles really hated Noram, and a lot of the city-states were sick of paying taxes to some distant overlord). As such, he refused. However, the nobles weren't going to take no for an answer. Despite his refusal, several of them started moving their estates, even going as far to name the new town they founded Capital City (more often referred to as Lordaeron City). Noram, realizing a coup was about to start, took his most trusted servants to an undisclosed location, sending orders to his empire through messengers.

It wasn't until Noram had passed away, succeeded by his younger brother Derek III, that people even knew where the king had moved his seat of power. It turned out that he had constructed a hidden fortress called Stormwind, far to the lands in the south. Derek was a lot more enterprising than his brother had been, turning Stormwind into a true city. Much of the high culture that had characterized Strom was moved to this new land, with the rulers of the city states claiming what little remained for themselves.
The city-state of Stromgarde
With the center of the empire moved to the city of Stormwind in the region of Azeroth, Strom was reduced to a mere city-state known as Stromgarde. And, compared to the other city-states, it was thoroughly outmatched. All but a handful of nobles had left for Azeroth or Lordaeron, bringing with them thousands of courtiers, the professors at the royal academy, the contents of the great library, large portions of the army, the arch-bishop, the artifacts of the great cathedral and the many businesses that catered to the higher classes. While Stromgarde controlled a lot of land, it wasn't very fertile, and all the easily accessible metals had already been mined out.

But what Stromgarde did have was hard-working, simple folks. Ignaeus Trollbane, a low-ranking baron, was one of these. Through simple, strong language and a focused mind, he had worked his way into being one of the highest-ranking military commanders of Arathor, and the highest-ranking one to remain in the new city-state. As such, he was named the lord of Stromgarde by high king Derek.

Under Ignaeus, Stromgarde developed a strong national identity in its preference for simplicity and tradition, which only became more pronounced in the generations that followed. No complicated system of nobility or code of laws was needed. The lord of stromgarde simply appointed some local bloke to act as a magistrate. No expensive educational system. Kids were simply taught by their parents, as they were expected to follow in their footsteps. No specialized military. Each citizen of the nation was responsible for keeping himself fit and trained. No massive churches or extensive priestly caste. Men of the cloth simply traveled around, given food and shelter by the villages they visited.

At their best, the people of Stromgarde were simple, efficient, easily content, incredibly loyal people. At their worst, they were uneducated, unimaginative xenophobic hicks. It's no wonder then that they got along just fine with the dwarves, and even less of a wonder that their relations with Dalaran and Gilneas were pretty bad.
The secession war
Wow, have I been typing on this one nation for a while. Lemme just go back and divide it into subchapters. Okay, where were we? Ah, right, the secession war. In the distant lands of Azeroth, High King Antonius was having a really bad day. In name, he was the grand ruler of humanity. It was his divine right, for he was a descendant of the great and legendary Thoradin himself. And in the lands of Azeroth, that right was respected. But in the distant north? They distanced himself more and more from his rule, only sending him a paltry token tax each year. One nation had even rejected the empire completely. Thoradin would have rolled over in his grave. But he would change that.

To each of the city states in his empire (plus alterac for good measure), Antonius sent a messenger. Their leaders were to appear before his court in three months time, so he could explain to them how he would reshape the empire into a more unified whole. Three months passed, and none of the leaders showed up (though he did get a number of very nice letters). This was an insult to the very empire, Antonius decided. If those northmen wouldn't respect him as the high king, he'd show them!

In Azeroth, massive armies were assembled. The six royal legions were gathered, along with the conjurers' guild, the clerical orders, and the brotherhoods of the horse, the ashen blade and the golden songbird. Brought to Azeroth by the Stormfleet, they would restore the empire of Arathor to its true glory. Southshore was the first city-state to fall, attacked without any warning or mercy. By the time the states of Lordaeron realized what was going on, Dalaran, Fenris, Stromgarde, Andorhal, Caer Darrow and Gilneas had also come under attack.

Azeroth possessed massive, well-organized armies, supported by conjurers, knights and clerics. Even banding together, the nations of Lordaeron were barely able to hold their ground. In time, Fenris, Andorhal, Tol Barad and Caer Darrow fell, with the other small city-states (except Dalaran) choosing to band together under the protection of Lordaeron.

However, while most mayor battles were stalemates or narrow losses, the nations of Lordaeron did possess some advantages. At sea, the united forces of Kul Tiras, Gilneas and Lordaeron were almost unstoppable, even executing raids against the Azerothian homelands. The lightly-armored warriors and horse archers of Stromgarde were able to conduct lightning-fast raids on Azerothian holdings, penetrating defenses and inducing large losses before the enemy could organize a defense. The cannons and musketeers of Gilneas were able to attack from great distances, destroying enemy fortifications without any way for them to strike back. The mages of Dalaran were able to dismiss any spell the conjurers could throw at them, with spellblades making short work of the knights that were relying on elemental back-up. Again and again, the war would follow the same pattern. Azeroth's massive armies would have a big victory, taking a large chunk of land. But, clever attacks by the forces of Lordaeron took back the land bit by bit. Thirty-four years, this war lasted, the bloodiest war in human history (at least, until the orcs invaded).

Back at home in Azeroth, the war was not popular. It was expensive, both in lives and cold hard cash, and most people had nothing to gain from it. Rodon Wrynn, a count from westfall, secretly contacted the fleets of Lordaeron. He had organized a small group of soldiers, which he would use to disable the harbor defenses of Stormwind City itself, allowing the fleets of Lordaeron to launch an attack directly against the city. His plan worked. In the night of glinting steel, strike teams from the continent of Lordaeron infiltrated the city, slaughtering their way through anyone that looked important enough. Thousands died, including the entire bloodline of the Arathi family bar a small three month old baby. The empire of Arathor was gone, supplanted by the age of kings.
The kingdom of Stromgarde
After the war, Azeroth's holdings in Lordaeron were given to the surviving nations as war reparations. Stromgarde annexed the former city state of Tol Barad, giving it something of a naval presence. Other than that, not much changed over the next few centuries. Thanks to the influence of the wildhammer dwarves, a strong hatred of arcane magic developed amongst the populace of Stromgarde. While it had few mages before, it was quickly reduced to only one, a court wizard from Dalaran who advised the Lord of Stromgarde. Aside from that minor finnigle, the people of Stromgarde were quite content to live as they always did.

Like most human nations, Stromgarde chose to join the alliance during the great war, acting as a buffer zone for the orcish armies coming from Khaz Modan. While Tol Barad was destroyed in a devestating first strike attack by the horde, surprisingly few battles took place on the mainland. Mostly, it was just raids by orcish scouts and dragonriders, with the bulk of the horde forces travelling by ship to bypass the Thandol Span. If you asked a stromgardian, they'd tell you that the orcs were scared of facing warriors that were a match for their own strength. If you asked anyone else, it was more about the poor terrain in Stromgarde making it hard to get vehicles through, the orcs preferring to bypass the region entirely. Later intelligence revealed that the orcs were planning an attack on Stromgarde by ship, but the alliance attacks on Grim Batol and Dun Algaz did enough damage to the horde refineries that such an attack could not be carried out.

Despite this, the people of Stromgarde suffered pretty major losses in the war, sending strike teams to aid the dwarves in their struggle for Khaz Modan and soldiers to aid in the defense of Lordaeron and Aerie Peak. When the war ended with the capture of Orgrim Doomhammer, the destruction of the dark portal, and the dragonmaw, blackrock and large chunks of the bleeding hollow clan imprisioned, Lord Thoras Trollbane of Stromgarde argued that the orcs should be exterminated so they could never pose a threat again. In addition, Trollbane argued that his people should get part of the treacherous nation of Alterac's land as war reparations. King Terenas Menethil however refused to commit genocide against the orcs, instead planning to raise them in camps and integrate them into human culture over time. Getting part of Alterac was also a problem, as the kings of the alliance were unable to reach a consensus. When Terenas took control of Alterac himself, Thoras abandoned the alliance, arguing that Terenas was treating it as his own personal Arathor. During the draenor incursion, Stromgarde saw some orcish raids near its border with alterac, but they were minor.

Following that, the people of Stromgarde saw decades of peace. Even when there were rumors of a small group of orcish remnants starting a campaign against the internment camps in Lordaeron, they didn't interfere, planning to let Lordaeron suffer enough losses that they would be convinced orcish genocide was a good thing. However, before that could happen, more dire reports started coming in. A plague had gripped the northlands. Cults of death-worshippers started unleashing monstrosities on the populace. When it was reported that Stratholme had fallen, Thoras started organizing an army to fight the undead before they could target his own nation.

That's when the geists struck. Single undead soldiers, raised from the corpses of criminals, capable of traversing vast distances in a single jump. For a hundred nights, geists roamed the countryside in roving packs, besetting cities while their citizens slept. Thousands of Stromgardians chose to abandon their homes, fleeing for greener pastures in the west, or taking a ship to Stormwind or Boralus. Invariably, some ended up with the alliance expedition.

The **** are they up to now?
The stromgarde refugees are only a tiny minority in the alliance of Theramore, but a few hundred in number. Mostly, they keep to their own district in the city, The Bulwark, built in the typical Stromgarde-style bunker-like architecture. The stromgardians maintain their strong hatred of orcs, with the few of them that leave the bulwark usually joining up with one of the anti-horde organizations. It's speculated by the council of Theramore that many of these organizations have contacts within The Bulwark that supply them with weapons and information.
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Old 09-09-2013, 04:42 PM
C9H20 C9H20 is offline

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I like you IJ so I feel obliged to point out that I am not reading your stuff not out of dislike but because I simply lack the energy and interest to get into huge fan interpretations of Warcraft. It is just that I am on my way out as a Warcraft fan. I haven't even read the latest short stories, just cba you know?

Though your work certainly looks commendable, due to sheer size if noting else

Rock on m8!

Same applies to other similar big fanworks.
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Old 09-14-2013, 04:55 AM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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I like you IJ so I feel obliged to point out that I am not reading your stuff not out of dislike but because I simply lack the energy and interest to get into huge fan interpretations of Warcraft. It is just that I am on my way out as a Warcraft fan. I haven't even read the latest short stories, just cba you know?

Though your work certainly looks commendable, due to sheer size if noting else
I feel personally insulted -_-. No, but seriously, I wasn't expecting this to be this asininely long when I was writing it. Honestly, I'm kinda wondering if anyone in their right mind has read this.
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Old 09-14-2013, 05:03 AM
Yaskaleh Yaskaleh is offline

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I feel personally insulted -_-. No, but seriously, I wasn't expecting this to be this asininely long when I was writing it. Honestly, I'm kinda wondering if anyone in their right mind has read this.
I read it but I am crazy.
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Old 09-16-2013, 08:46 PM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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And, deciding to do slightly shorter ones rather than drop all nations at once. Dalaran's backstgory has some bits copied from the world of warcraft in-game history books, though I did alter some important bits in each copied area.

Dalaran
Expanded Backstory
In exchange for military aid against the forest trolls, the elves of quel'thalas promised to train one hundred humans in the arts of magic. For the elves, the plan had been to give the humans only really basic training, enough to impress Thoradin and his fellow primitives, but not even close to matching the elves' own power or a even to serve as a basis to further develop their own magical skills. Because the humans mages could still be useful against Kaz'jin's forces, this basic training focused primarily on fire-based combat magic, culminating in the human and elven magisters calling down gouts of magical flame upon the troll armies.

However, humanity proved to be far more adept at magic than the elves expected, possessing some innate affinity for the flow of the arcane the elves hadn't seen in any species but themselves. Even with just a few weeks of basic training, the humans already started experimenting with their powers, molding their fire into different shapes. By the end of the training, they had started experimenting with other magical domains, like ice, life and wind.

In the years following the defeat of Kaz'jin, humans expanded their powers and studied the mystic disciplines of spell-weaving in much greater detail. Ice magic, something which the elves had little experience with, became a particular point of focus for these mages, almost developing into a form of art. The original hundred mages had been chosen for their strong wills, noble spirits and the ability to practice magic with care and responsibility. However, they passed their secrets and powers onto younger magicians that had been picked for their cleverness and initiative, rather than any sense for the necessity of self-restraint.

Wielding their mystical powers, the new magicians protected their brethren from the wild creatures of the land and made it possible for Arathor to claim the entire highlands protected by Thoradin's wall, and even expand into the territory behind it. Yet, as their powers grew, the magicians became ever more isolated from the rest of society and the heavy restrictions the state of arathor had imposed on the use of magic.

Using their great powers, about two hundred mages managed to secure a small bit of land near the coast of Lordamere Lake, far beyond the reach of Strom. Here, they used their magics to construct a city for themselves, their family and a few trusted friends that chose to come along. Needless to say, high king Freyson, son of Thoradin, wasn't too happy about a bunch of mages declaring themselves independent so they could go mess with reality.

Despite the distance from the areas controlled by Arathor, Freyson sent his armies to surround the city, now named Dalaran, only a few weeks after it was founded. The mages, confident (arguably overconfident) in their abilities, did not back down against the armies that stood before them. Would Freyson attack, there would be a bloodbath the likes of which humanity had never seen. However, rather than attacking, Freyson maintained the siege and instead called in an old debt. Within a week, a few dozen magisters from Silvermoon appeared to stand alongside the armies of Strom. Faced with opposition that could match their own powers, the wizards of Dalaran agreed to negotiate with Freyson. As long as the city-state of Dalaran kept answering to orders from the throne, paid taxes to the throne and did not expand their lands beyond a small area, they would be given a large measure of self-governance, acting as their own state within the greater empire.

With the loosened laws regarding the usage of magic in Dalaran, almost all of the mages of Arathor chose to travel to the new city, excited to use their powers with greater freedom. These magicians used their skills to build up the enchanted spires of Dalaran and reveled in the pursuit of their studies. Within a generation, Dalaran had grown into a large, beautiful city, rivaling Strom itself. Though the city was dedicated to the practice of magic, the bulk of its population was still made up by those who lacked the talent to use magic. These citizens built a bustling economy under the protection of their magic-using defenders. Yet, as more and more magicians practiced their arts in such a small area, the fabric of reality around Dalaran began to weaken and tear.

Demons, not seen on Azeroth since the destruction of the well of eternity, began slipping through small cracks in reality. Though most of these accidental invaders were lesser demons, and they did not act in force, they did sow considerable confusion and chaos within the streets of Dalaran. Most of these demonic encounters were isolated events, and the ruling Magocrats did what they could to keep such events hidden from the public. The most powerful magicians were sent to capture the elusive demons, but they often found themselves hopelessly outmatched when encountering the few greater demons that had been summoned.

After a few months the superstitious peasantry began to suspect that their sorcerous rulers were hiding something terrible from them. Rumors of revolution began to sweep through the streets of Dalaran as the paranoid citizenry questioned the motives and practices of the magicians they had once admired. The Magocrats, fearing that the peasants would revolt and that Strom would take action against them, turned to the only group they felt would understand their particular problem: the elves.

Upon hearing the Magocrats' news of demonic activity in Dalaran, the elves quickly dispatched their mightiest wizards to the human lands. The elven wizards studied the energy currents in Dalaran and made detailed reports of all demonic activity that they beheld. While they concluded that only a few dangerous demons had been called forth, the threat of new demons itself would remain a dire threat so long as humans continued to wield the forces of magic.

The Council of Silvermoon, which ruled over the elves of Quel'Thalas, entered into a secret pact with the Kirin Tor, the Magocrat lords of Dalaran. The elves told the Magocrats about the history of ancient Kalimdor and of the Burning Legion, a history which still threatened the world. They informed the humans that so long as they used magic, they would need to protect their citizenry from the malicious agents of the Legion. While Dalaran was shielded using a runestone created by the elven druids, it was quickly realized that this couldn't protect all human territory (the runestones required empowerment from ley lines, and without the elven sunwell, their range was very limited). Instead, the Magocrats proposed the notion of empowering a single mortal champion who would utilize the collective powers of man and elf to fight a never-ending secret war against the Legion. It was stressed that the majority of mankind could never know about the Guardians or the threat of the Legion for fear that they would riot in fear and paranoia. The elves agreed to the proposal and together, the elves and magocrats founded a secret society that would watch over the selection of the Guardian and help to stem the rise of chaos in the world.

The society held its secret meetings in the shadowed Tirisfal Glades, then still unsettled, where the high elves had first settled in Lordaeron. Thus, they named the secret sect the Guardians of Tirisfal. The mortal champions who were chosen to be Guardians were imbued with incredible powers of both elven and human magic, maintained by an ancient highborne artifact known as Atiesh. Though there could only ever be one Guardian at a time, they held such vast power that they could single-handedly fight back the Legion's agents throughout the empire. Whenever a Guardian grew too old, or wearied of the secret war against chaos, the Council chose a new champion, and under controlled conditions, formally channeled the Guardian power into its new agent.

While some of the other human nations maintained their own users of arcane magic (like the guild of conjurers and the clerics of Saint Seraph the Exalted in Azeroth, the hedge mages in Alterac, the hydromancers in Kul Tiras or the royal court of magicians in Gilneas), Dalaran remained the absolute capital of arcane magic, eventually rivaling great Silvermoon itself. Through its entire history, Dalaran maintained open borders for any with the talent and will to study arcane magic, no matter their species. As such, while it remained dominantly human, the city also had populations of elves, dwarves, goblins and gnomes living there.

Like most human nations, Dalaran was involved in the secession wars, serving as the most important of the frontline city-states. It's said that more soldiers died attacking and defending Dalaran than died in the entire rest of the war put together. No matter the truth of that statement, it's certain that Dalaran was the single most hotly contested place in the entire war, besieged no less than twenty-four times throughout the war. Despite that, the city never fell, and it remained the only one of the smaller city-states to not become part of a greater kingdom after the war. The territory of the city did expand slightly after the war, now encompassing the nearby Cross Island, on which the magocrats constructed the Violet Citadel. The Kirin Tor also established a colony called on Northrend called Wintergarde.

During the second war, Dalaran joined the alliance to fight the invading orcish horde. They worked together closely with the conjurers of Stormwind and the Seraphian clerics, combining their knowledge to train elite battle-mages to serve in the alliance armies. While Dalaran suffered heavy damage during an orc attack, and the violet citadel (to which the kirin tor government had moved) was destroyed completely, the nation survived the war, creating an artifact known as the Eye of Dalaran to help them rebuild (with the violet citadel moved to the main city). This artifact was captured by orcish forces during the Draenor incursion, but safely retrieved by the alliance expedition before the orcs managed to use it.

After the second war, Dalaran remained a member of the alliance, working closely with Lordaeron and Kul Tiras. This lasted all the way until the third war, in which Dalaran was the first nation to notice that something was off, as reports came in from Wintergarde regarding a magical plague. Roughly around the time Alterac fell, all contact with Wintergarde had been lost.

When Jaina Proudmoore organized her expedition to Kalimdor, she managed to gather massive support amongst the Kirin Tor (after all, the council of six already knew of Kalimdor's existence and the night elves, so the claims of The Prophet were a lot less improbable). Dozens of the most experienced archmages in the city, including two members of the council of six, as well as the eye of dalaran and a large contingent of spellblades and elven sorceresses, joined Jaina's expedition.

After the expedition had left, Dalaran itself came under siege from the scourge, who were attempting to acquire the book of medivh. While the scourge were unable to take Dalaran themselves, they managed to get their hands on the book of medivh, using it to summon Archimonde. With a demonic ritual, he crushed the entire city, the undead slaughtering the few survivors.

On Kalimdor, the kirin tor members of the expedition used the eye of dalaran to create the city of Theramore, giving all the refugees from Lordaeron a safe haven while the expedition forces explored the continent. The Kirin Tor forces accompanied Jaina herself, following a trail of magical energy that led them to Stonetalon Peak, the oracle and the alliance with the new horde.

The **** are they up to now?
Hearing of the destruction of their beloved city through Daelin's forces, the kirin tor have dedicated themselves to rebuilding. They have formed a new council of six, seated in the amethyst spire, a large structure that towers over the rest of Theramore.

The Kirin Tor have essentially become the dominant power in Theramore, with Jaina, who also leads the tirasian refugees, on the council of six, the refugees of Lordaeron without central leadership (so being directly under the control of the council of theramore) and the high elves closely allied with the council of six. This has led to a lot of political friction within the city, as the other nations fear being overshadowed by the magocrats, something not helped by members of the kirin tor determined to turn Theramore into a new Dalaran (though they usually mean that as in "pretty magical city", rather than as the nation). The gilneans in particular have taken a massive dislike to the dalarani, and it is unwise for any member of the Kirin Tor to visit The Shanks without escort.
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Old 09-16-2013, 10:20 PM
EdWunclerIII EdWunclerIII is offline

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I really like it. It's rare to see fanon on the background of Warcraft before the events of Warcraft 1 take place. Nice work.
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Old 09-17-2013, 04:32 AM
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Is your name Ramses? Sounds like an egyptian name.
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Old 09-17-2013, 07:11 AM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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I really like it. It's rare to see fanon on the background of Warcraft before the events of Warcraft 1 take place. Nice work.
Thank you very much.

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Is your name Ramses? Sounds like an egyptian name.
Aye, it is. It means "son of Ra" to be precise. Killing Rajh was like patricide

Gilneas
Expanded Backstory
Arathor was a land of strict laws and social divides. Religion, art, education, music, architecture and marriage, all was handled or restricted by the state. The nobles were given extraordinary amounts of rights and powers to lord over their fellow man, including an education at the court of Strom and freedom to inflict harm on any of their subjects without having to state a reason. Naturally, few nobles objected. Amongst these few was Count William Greymane, Lord of Greystone Keep.

Gathering a few of his like-minded nobles, Greymane enters a conspiracy. Inspired by the example of Dalaran, he is determined to forge a city-state for himself and his followers. Over the next ten years, the rebel nobles secretly transport followers and resources to the distant gilnean peninsula, establishing a large town called Gilneas City, before vanishing themselves, the lords of Arathor baffled where their fellow nobles suddenly disappeared to.

It wasn't until thirty years later, as the empire of Arathor was attempting to destroy the last major gnoll strongholds in silverpine forest, that they learned. Greymane, knowing that his new kingdom would eventually have to face Arathor again, had left some spies behind in the imperial armies. Through these spies, he learned that the imperial armies were actually having real trouble with the gnolls, due to their nests being hidden underground. Soldiers would pass the nest without realizing it was there, and then get ambushed from behind.

Gilneas, which had been settled near the southern end of the gnoll homelands, had actually discovered that the forest wolves were able to track down the gnoll nests by scent. As such, they had tamed a large number of these wolves, using them to weed out all the gnolls they could find. Sending a courier to Strom, William Greymane offered High King Dinmirod a simple deal. His new nation would be acknowledged as a city-state by Arathor, given the same rights, if a bit more terrain, as Dalaran. In return, his trained wolves would help the forces of Arathor cleanse Silverpine, sparing Dinmirod a humiliating public defeat. Dinmirod, who was already on thin ice with the nobles and feared a take-over by his brother, gave in.

Over the centuries, Gilneas grew into a centre of arts, culture and engineering. Gilneas was home to the world's finest sculpturers and painters. It was in Gilneas that the movements of Opera, orchestra and a capella first started and the first pipe organs were put into use, with the haunting music from the cathedral of golden saints in Gilneas City, along with the massive choirs that accompanied it, being famous throughout human civilization. Galleries of fine arts portrayed sculptures and paintings from the most brillian creators in Gilnean society. It was they who first developed the uses of perspective, foreshortening and porcelain, and developed the extravaganze of the baroque style.

Religiously, there was a lot more freedom in Gilneas than in early arathor, and many who sought to upheld the old tribal beliefs of humanity travelled to the peninsula. The most famous of these were the harvest witches, but there was also the horse lords, the oceanwalkers, the harbingers of the red scale and the cult of wolves. The church of light still remained the dominant belief system, though in time, new directions developed within the church as well. Gilneas was the birthplace of the Seraphic and Anglican interpretations of the holy light, which would later become the mainstream religions in north-east Lordearon and Azeroth respectively.

During the first contact with the dwarves in a joint gilnean-alterac expedition, the gilneans traded their plans for the printing press for the dwarves' formula for gunpowder. The gilneans quickly started experimenting with the possibilities, foregoing the dwarves' usage of buckshot, and instead developing guns that accurately fired single bullets over long ranges. The gilneans also applied this principle on a larger scale, developing the first human cannons.

For over a millenium, Gilneas remained the most influential of the city-states due to nobles throughout the empire adhering to the Gilnean high culture. At several times, Gilneas even eclipsed Strom itself in political importance, which the nation used to expand beyond the limits set by the original city-state agreement. In time, Gilneas controlled not only the entire peninsula, but also expanded into the north and took control of purgation isle. This land was divided into thirteen lordships, their leaders forming the house of lords. Each of these lords possessed enough political power that the heads of entire city states often bowed to them, rather than the other way around.

Unfortunately for the Gilneans, this situation could not last. With the rise of Kul Tiras as a merchant empire, and the religious centre of the continent shifting to Lordaeron, Gilneas waned in importance. The high culture that had once dominated humanity was now practiced solely by the gilneans themselves. In time, a rift grew between Gilneas and the other states, the gilneans regarding the people of the other states as uneducated gits (which, to be fair, was not exactly false), and the other states regarding Gilneans as elitist jackasses (again, not exactly false). Gilneas' continued friendly association with the rogue kingdom of Alterac only made the rift grow larger.

In the seccession war, the gilneans became feared for their ability to engage the enemy at long ranges, their guns and cannons often mowing down Azerothian armies without them being able to strike back in any way. The azerothians briefly tried to take out the gilnean armies through sabotage, but the well-trained gilnean guard dogs were able to make short work of any infiltrators. Throughout the entirety of the war, the gilneans didn't lose any of their lordships.

However, the gilneans did lose what little goodwill remained with the other human city-states. They absolutely refused to coordinate attacks and defenses, confident that they could fight this war on their own. It wasn't exactly an empty belief either, with the fleets of Gilneas actually doing significant damage to Azeroth itself, destroying the port city of Balor, and even managing to bombard the coasts of Westfall.

Despite the bad relations, Gilneas, under king Genn Greymane, did agree to join the alliance, though it wasn't exactly a fruitful cooperation. By the end of the great war, with Lordaeron taking control of Alterac and the orcs being cared for in internment camps (both things Genn vehemently opposed), Gilneas essentially told the rest of the world to sod off. Constructing a massive wall, they closed off the peninsula from anyone.

Naturally, not everyone was happy with this. Lord Crowley of the Pyremarsh and Lord Harford of the Amber Vale had been cut off from the rest of country, and the former did not take it well, starting to organize a rebellion against greymane. In the hopes of gaining the support of the alliance after this undead thing had been dealt with, he sent a large contingent of soldiers along with Jaina Proudmoore's expedition. In addition, some of the locals chose to join the expedition as refugees, fearing that the undead would strike there next.

The **** are they up to now?
There was a tiny problem however. In Gilneas, intellect and creativity are very highly regarded. Those with any brains in their head become craftsmen or artists, travelling to to the culture and commerce of the gilnean peninsula. Those who possessed neither quality were stuck with less desirable jobs, like working as common soldiers, farmers and woodcutters. And as it so happened, the pyrewood and the amber vale, the only region from which refugees could reach the expedition, were a logging and farming community respectively.

Normally, that wouldn't be a problem. After all, the lowest classes amongst the gilneans still get a better education than 99% of the inhabitans of Lordaeron, so it's not like they were really stand-outs amongst the rest of the expedition. Unfortunately, they were also proud gilneans, and gilneans tend to be more than a bit dismissive of the other nations. Instead of just integrating into the greater Theramore economy, the gilneans were determined to set up their own community, without any aid from the other nations.

Outside the gates of Theramore, without the aid from the eye of dalaran, they constructed their own 'town', which they called Ginnsborough. With no workers with desirable skills, no craftsmen and no clever minds, the town quickly devolved into a hive of crime and smuggling. Its official name has already fallen by the wayside in favor of The Shanks, named for the tool most commonly used within the town. Any efforts by the council of theramore to create some order are vehemently opposed by the proud citizens, who would rather get their purse cut and their daughters sold by the docks then need to rely on aid from those knobheads in the city. On the plus side, the gilneans look down upon the horde only slightly more than they look down upon other humans, so there's not a lot of gilneans eager to restart a war with the horde, and a clever adventurer can make a pretty ninepence doing some dirty work in The Shanks.



So a question: Use the real-life months (januari, februrary, august, etc.), or invent some new ones?
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Old 09-17-2013, 07:34 AM
Yaskaleh Yaskaleh is offline

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Thank you very much.



Aye, it is. It means "son of Ra" to be precise. Killing Rajh was like patricide

snip

So a question: Use the real-life months (januari, februrary, august, etc.), or invent some new ones?
Use them as inspiration, like calling the months Janua, Februa, Augua etc.
That sounds nice. That's one for the solcu project.
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Old 09-17-2013, 07:46 AM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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Use them as inspiration, like calling the months Janua, Februa, Augua etc.
That sounds nice. That's one for the solcu project.
I was thinking of a system without months altogether actually. The year is divided into four seasons of ninety-one days (thirteen weeks each), with the additional day of noblegarden (equivalent to the 28th of februari on our calendar) between winter and spring, and belongs to neither season. Once every four years, noblegarden would be extended an extra day.


so, the 14th of july would be the 45th day of summer instead.
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Old 09-17-2013, 07:51 AM
Yaskaleh Yaskaleh is offline

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I was thinking of a system without months altogether actually. The year is divided into four seasons of ninety-two days (thirteen weeks each), with the additional day of noblegarden (equivalent to the 28th of februari on our calendar) between winter and spring, and belongs to neither season. Once every four years, noblegarden would be extended an extra day.


so, the 14th of july would be the 44th day of summer instead.
So in your version the Azerothian year lasts for 369,25 days?
That would not be 13 weeks each but 13 weeks + 1 days each season.
92 days are 13x7+1.
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Old 09-17-2013, 07:58 AM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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So in your version the Azerothian year lasts for 369,25 days?
That would not be 13 weeks each but 13 weeks + 1 days each season.
92 days are 13x7+1.
Stupid error of mine there. I meant 91 days, not 92, giving us the same year length as reality.
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Old 09-18-2013, 04:25 PM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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Kul Tiras
Expanded Backstory
In Arathor and most of its city-states, the aristocracy was king. The common man was expected to live a short life of hard work, no dreams and loyalty. However, to every rule there was an exception. Eugene proudmoore grew up an orphan on the streets of Andorhal, his parents executed as horse thieves when he was only nine. Like most of his fellow orphans, he originally relied on begging and stealing. However, by the time he was twelve, he realized the value of information, and the fact that most people weren't exactly careful with it around children. New trading routes discussed by the aristocracy were sold to criminals, while hiding places discussed by criminals were sold to the aristocracy. Realizing he couldn't keep this up for long without being found out, he started recruiting other orphans as proxies to gather information. By the time Eugene was nineteen, his network spanned the entirety of Andorhal. He was one of the most powerful men in the city, and barely anyone even knew he existed. He started expanding his influence through blackmail and even a bit of legitimate trading, raking in massive amounts of money, which he hid away. By the time Eugene was 25, pretty much everyone suspected that there was some sort of shadowy criminal mastermind running the underworld, but they hadn't been able to find him. Still, Eugene decided that the risks were getting too high and he had got himself enough money. The illustrious criminal mastermind of Andorhal vanished, his identity only known through his diary, published by his great-granddaughter.

Eugene had moved to Southshore, where he used his loads and loads of cash to become a trader. With his natural cleverness and skills with information gathering, he was able to expand his company. By the time his son, Claude Proudmoore, inherited the company, the trading company had become the largest in Southshore. Claude, who had an eye for art, expanded the company into gilneas. At the time, Gilnean art had become a cultural symbol amongst the courts of Lordaeron, even though a lot of the nobles didn't really have a fine eye for it. Claude was able to make a lot of money by buying art from second-string or up-and-coming artists in Gilneas, and selling them for small fortuned on the other end of the continent. But it wasn't just money that was earned, it was also goodwill from the aristocracy. Claude was welcomed at any court in the realm, and through that, he was also able to make lucrative deals regarding the transport of more mundane goods.

By the time Claude's daughter, Fosilla Proudmore, became the head of the company, the proudmoore trading company was the richest and most powerful company in all of Lordaeron. Deciding that the Proudmoore family could use its own private docks, she purchased a large portion of the isle of Tiras, and started construction. Around the new docks, a small village called Boralus emerged. As the generations passed, and the influence of the proudmoore family grew even further (even eclipsing that of the smaller city states like Fenris and Tyr's Hand), so did the city of Boralus.

In ancient times, Thoradin united all the human tribes. At least, all the tribes he could find. For there were two tribes he missed. The first were the Sehanchi, the dark-skinned inhabitants of the isles of Crestfall and Tiras. Never having been part of the empire of Arathor, they possessed a vastly different culture. They were ruled by a council of 19, 7 of which elected by the people, 7 of which chosen by the aristocracy, 4 of which chosen by the previous council, 1 of which elevated from the priesthood. This priesthood did not actually wield divine magic, but performed arcane rites described in scrolls so ancient they are said to predate humanity. Through these scrolls, the priesthood gained mastery over the element of water. Metal on Crestfall and Tiras was almost non-existant, tools instead made from laquered wood.

Fosilla managed to befriend the Sehanchi, one of the few arathor humans to have been able to do so at the time (several times before, there'd been attempts to conquer the sehanchi, or swindle them, resulting in a bit of a tarnished reputation). She'd made some very valuable trade agreements with them, not the least of which was trading iron and the services of experienced smiths for the services of the water priests of the sehanchi, invaluable at sea for their combat techniques and ability to extract fresh water from seawater. With many years of friendship between Fosilla and the sehanchi, they were only too glad to sell her a part of the island that the Sehanchi had never been able to properly settle due to a murloc infestation.

The second group were the Jahaad, yellow-skinned people from the isle of Tel Abim. The jahaad were a highly religious society, controlled by the priesthood of Ol Doron. These priests stated that the entire world was one giant ocean, with a few small islands dotting the landscape. The jahaad were the children of the sea god, a massive beating heart at the core of the world, and the sea giants and trolls were children who disobeyed him. Naturally, when an explorer from Boralus arrived on the isle, it caused a bit of a stir. He spoke of massive stretches of land, of humans not living near the ocean, or priests who possessed actual magical abilities. At first, they didn't belief him, but his boat was actually carrying a sehanchi water priest, who was only too glad to show off his abilities. The Ol Doron didn't take this well, and tried to have the explorers executed as heathens, but the water magic and flintlocks (the proudmoore family had purchased the gunpowder formula from the gilneans for a massive sum) made quick work of the attacks of the priests, armed with blowguns and spears. Naturally, having actual proof that their priests weren't exactly as great as they'd always claimed didn't go over well with the populace, and there was a rather brutal, if short-lived revolution. The explorers fought alongside the people overthrowing the priests, gaining a valuable new ally for the Proudmoore family in the process. Tel Abim was home to many exotic plants, not the least of which the banana tree, the cocoa plant and the coffee bean, and the trade in these products earned the proudmoores millions upon millions.

Fosilla's son, Elerean Proudmoore expanded the exotic food trade, founding outposts throughout the isles of the south seas, and even some on Northrend. However, this is also when the threat of the goblins first emerged. Short green dumb creatures that had originally been enslaved by the trolls of Kezan, they staged a succesful rebellion after being exposed to the intelligence-boosting mineral Kaja'mite. Now, the goblins developed rudimentary technology, and they were striking out on their own. Trading vessels and outposts being raided, sometimes even entire colonies, became a common occurence around this point. While the goblins didn't possess the technology they do today yet, they did have natural cleverness, taking control of human vessels to use them in ambushes. Tel Abim was particularly skeeved, as the trade in exotic food had brought them great wealth and they'd become highly reliant on it.

Elerean, who aspired even greater greatness for the proudmoores, offered them a simple deal. He was planning to turn Boralus, a pretty large city by this point, into a city-state. If they joined his new city-state, he would protect them against the goblins. The jahaad agreed. The sehanchi, who were having their own problems with goblin raiders, followed soon after. On the 32nd day of summer, in the year of the empire 1607, the city-state of Kul Tiras (or "Greater Tiras" in sehanchi) was born (and before you start wondering how a human city-state, which have a restricted size, could include an island on the other side of the known planet as well as colonies throughout the south seas and northrend, you should know that an immense deposit was made into the then-depleted coffers of the high king on the day Kul Tiras was founded.)

The goblins remained a continuous threat to the safety of trading throughout the south seas, until the conflict culminated in the trade wars, with goblins attacking the tirasian colony of Hearthbay, stealing millions of gold in goods, as well as several tirasian ships. These ships were then used in a series of ambushes, stealing even more gold. The tirasians responded in kind, attacking and raiding goblin vessels on sight. The war escalated, until it ended with the tirasians attacking Kezan itself, entering the undermine and killing Trade King Scroogegear. As the goblins turned on one another for control of their species, the tirasians left to repair their infrastructure and restore order in their kingdom.

For hundreds of years, the tirasians dominated the seas of Azeroth, possessing the mightiest navy on the planet. In time, the rule of the proudmoores switched from self-enrichment to true governance. There came a greater sense of the Tirasians as a culture, though one that integrated the diverse origins of its inhabitants. In addition to the many human cultures that had settled on the island, a community of Dwarves also developed around the village of Drisburg, while Boralus had a number of notable high elf citizens.

Like most human nations, the tirasians partook in the secession wars, their massive fleets of fast ships countering the azerothian naval efforts at every turn. It was the tirasians and the lordaeronians who manned the final raid against Stormwind City, and it is said that the proudmoore family still owns several relics from ancient Arathor they took during the raid.

In the spring of 471, the goblins once again launched organized attacks against Tiras (in response to the tirasians destroying a large smuggling network the goblins had set up through the tirasian territories), starting the second trade war. In the time since the last war, they had developed a technologically advanced society. While their technology wasn't as impressive as that of the gnomes or as reliable as that of the dwarves, it was easy to use and produce. Zeppelins and war balloons were their greatest weapon, allowing the goblins to simply bomb the tirasian ships to oblivion from a large enough range that they weren't able to shoot back. The tirasians did launch attacks against the goblin strongholds in response, but each battle cost the tirasian fleets more than they could afford. They were losing the war.

Luckily, the tirasians had specialties beyond their naval power. In this case, it was diplomatic and trading skills. In the mountains near Ironforge, a group of small creatures called 'gnomes' had recently set up their own city, said to be a marvel of technology that put even Gilneas City to shame. So, representatives of the proudmoore family travelled to gnomeregan to ask these masters of technology if they could figure out a way to counter the zeppelin.

Six months later, the gnomes came with a solution. They had constructed a small vehicle, which could be lifted in the air by a series of rotating blades. To function beyond the energy systems of Gnomeregan, the gnomes had built in a crude engine, which could power the propellors through the burning of refined oil. In return for supplying the gnomes with several rare materials they wanted, the gnomes offered these machines and their services as pilots, turning the tide in the war. With the goblin zeppelin fleet in ashes, and the tirasian fleets bombarding the coasts of Kezan, the goblin trade princes surrendered. Because of how badly the last two attempts at war went for them, the trade princes instead decided on an official policy of neutrality for each of the goblin cartels, and that any cartel who refused to follow this policy was kicked off Kezan.

In the third war, Kul Tiras was spared much of the early horror of the scourge. Despite that, many tirasians chose to flee with Jaina Proudmoore's expedition, forming one of the largest populations within it. Only with the destruction of Dalaran did the scourge send any troops towards Tiras itself. By the time Daelin's fleet left the isle, multiple necropoli had been brought down over the isle, one destroying the city of Drisburg.

The **** are they up to now?
The tirasian refugees occupy the outer parts of Theramore city, particularly the areas around the docks, as well as being the most dominant group in Northwatch. While lacking the trade routes that made them so powerful in Lordaeron, they're still the most economically influential of the alliance population groups in Kalimdor, as they are in control of the fishing fleets that provide Theramore with the vast majority of its food, and conduct most of the trade with Ratchet and Orgrimmar.

Unfortunately, the tirasians are also the population group that want to kill the horde the most. Most of them saw Daelin Proudmoore as a hero when he came and said he was going to wipe the orcs out, with many civilians choosing to join his forces. When the orcs came to kill Daelin, they killed most of these militias, along with many of the Kul Tiras Elite Core, which had protected the Tirasians while they were on Kalimdor and even fought alongside the horde at the battle of mount hyjal. Nearly every Tirasian lost someone they knew in the horde's attack on Daelin. It is a known fact that many of the anti-horde militias throughout Kalimdor get their supplies through the tirasian community. Horde traders (or even non-horde traders of species associated with the horde, like tauren and goblins) are recommended to try and get out of the docks as soon as they arrive. It's even rumored that Knight-captain fairmount, head of the knights of the red wave and the most important leader amongst the anti-horde groups, is hiding somewhere in the tirasian neighborhoods.
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Old 09-22-2013, 03:27 AM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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Lordaeron
Expanded Backstory
No one had actually expected Azeroth to attack the continent of Lordaeron. Waging a war that would take decades from half-way accross the other side of the planet? Insane. And doing that on a short notice with no prior troop buildups whatsoever? Utter and complete madness. So, by the time the Lordaeronians actually realized they were under attack, it was largely too late. Southshore had fallen, while Fenris, Tol Barad and Andorhal had such massive armies bearing down on them that their falls were inevitable. Desperately, the city-states scrambled, trying to coordinate some sort of defense. The main problem with fighting off the azerothians was that central and northern lordaeron were so dividided. In the south-east and south-west there were the power blocks of Gilneas and Stromgarde, both disproportionally powerful compared to their peers. However, the central states in Lordaeron couldn't possibly stand on their own.

So they didn't. On year after the devestating opening strike by Azeroth, the leaders of six out of the seven remaining smaller city-states met in Capital City, uniting under a common flag. Ommoroth Menethil, former archduke of Capital City, became the first king of the nation of Lordaeron, with stratholme, hearthglen, tyr's hand, caer darrow and tirisfal as duchies within his domain. When the lordaeronians defeated the azerothians, this new nation also took control of most of the territories the azerothians had conquered in Azeroth, including the former city-states of Fenris, Andorhal and Southshore.

As usually happens when you slap nations together, you end with a bit of an internal division. This was especially notable in regards to religion. Tyr's hand, Hearthglen and Stratholme followed the seraphic interpretation of the light, which had the light not as one distinct entity, but as a collection of holy spirits with distinct goals and personalities, which they referred to as angels. Fenris and Southshore followed the dualistic interpretation of the light, which not only regarded the light as a divine entity, but also believed in a counterpart called the void, which non-believers and sinners would be absorbed by after their deaths. Capital City, Tirisfal, Andorhal and Caer Darrow followed the spiritualistic interpretation of the light, which had the light as not being an entity at all, but rather a state of mind.

(editor's note: aside from the interpretations of the light found in Lordaeron, there is also
-the solarian interpretation, which regards the sun as the ultimate incarnation of the light, and believes that each creature/each intelligent creature/each elf, human, dwarf and gnome (it depends on who you ask) has been born with a tiny shard of solar essence connecting them to the divine. This interpretation is favored by the elves.
-the anglican interpretation, which regards certain humans, which they refer to as saints, as living incarnations of the light set on earth to guide the rest of humanity. Anglicist priests are divided between clerical orders, each dedicated to a different saint. Anglicism is primarily practiced in Stormwind)

The priesthood in each of the duchies was afraid that their interpretation was gonna be pushed out in favor of some foreign one, so they started investing massive amounts of money and effort in keeping the religions as ingrained in society as possible. And the citizenry responded in kind, developing a fanatical loyalty to their local church. The great cities of Lordaeron became bastions of the light, the bishops of each duchy as least as influential as the duke himself. Of the ten largest cathedrals in the world, no less than eight were located in the kingdom of Lordaeron. Knights swore their loyalty not just to their king, but also to the church, with them being divided into three orders accordingly: the Circle of Holy Light for the seraphists, the Crippling Force for the dualists and the Defenders of Justice for the spiritualists.

With the second war came a ton of refugees from Azeroth, almost all of which were anglican. Because unity was needed to defend against the orcs, the three knightly orders, as well as the surviving members of the azerothian brotherhood of the horse, were united under the flag of the knights of the silver hand. One of the most ancient restrictions in the church of the holy light, that of combining the life of a priest with that of a military man, was lifted, with priests and clerics teaching the knights how to wield the power of the light in battle. Those who proved themselves capable of wielding the light became the mighty paladins (for that matter, so did priests who proved themselves capable of wielding a battlehammer, and every single surviving cleric in the orders of both st. Marilyn of the sacred vows and st. Andrews the just.)

Even with the second war over, the training of paladins remained unrestricted by the church. In time, even the prince of Lordaeron, Arthas Menethil, was given the training of a paladin. Specifically, Arthas was given an egalitarian paladin training, with no focus on a particular interpretation of the light since the king didn't want his people to fracture over religion even more. That turned out to be both wrong and far too late.

The **** are they up to now?
When the lordaeronians first came with Jaina Proudmoore's expedition, they were led by Duke Lionheart of Tirisfal. While the seraphics and the dualists weren't really happy to be led by a spiritualist, he was the highest ranking noble that came with the expedition. However, when Duke Lionheart was coordinating joint lumber harvesting efforts with Thrall's horde during the lead-up to the battle of mount hyjal, his camp was attacked by a night elf raiding party, resulting in his death.

The lordaeronian refugees couldn't agree who should succeed him though. According to the spiritualists, Viscount Artignan of Brill is the clear choice, being the highest-ranking noble after Lionheart. According to the dualists, a bishop should outrank a mere viscount, and say that Bishop Angstrom of Fenris is the obvious choice. The seraphics support Baron Esterburg of Glendale Keep, because he is a very, very, very distant relative of the previous king, for a certain definition of relative (specifically, he was father-in-law of Terenas' cousin thrice removed)

The conflict has left the lordaeronians leaderless and divided. Even their living quarters are divided, with the three groups living in nonadjacent neighborhoods. Though most of the lordaeronians take massive pride in their nation, it is likely that it will fall apart if some solution is not found soon.

Alliance Criminal Organizations
The Hand of the Dawn
A religiously motivated group of soldiers that continue the war against not just the horde, but all species they deem naturally evil. The hand of faith consists of stromgardians and dualists from Lordaeron, determined to send orcs, tauren, trolls, ogres, centaur, murlocs, dragons and goblins 'back to The Void, from whence they came'. The hand of faith is a relatively small group, and their attacks are limited to attacking orc traders and tauren hunting parties.

The Grey Syndicate
A large group of smugglers who specialize in drugs that are legal in Ratchet but illegal in Theramore or New Strahnbrad. They are primarily made up of ex-military alteraceans and gilneans, but also have tirasian, goblin and even tauren farwanderers in their membership.

The Cult of Shrouded Stars
Thusfar, the exact purpose and origin of the cult of shrouded stars has remained unclear. Investigation has linked them to both attacks on the horde and the smuggling of forbidden magical goods, with membership consisting primarily of Dalarani, Alteraceans, Jahaad, Goblins and Sehanchi. The black cult is known to wield dark magics, such as necromancy, void magic or demonic magic, but does not appear to be linked to the scourge.

The knights of the red wave
Originally, Lordaeron and Azeroth were the only countries that employed knights. However, during the second war, Knight-captain Sarah Fairmount, the last surviving knight of the azerothian Order of the Gilded Rose, befriended Daelin Proudmoore. Stationed on his vessel as his bodyguard, she adapted her battle techniques for the navy-based tactics of the Tirasians. After the war, she chose to stay with Proudmoore, working for him to train a new order of tirasian knights, the knights of the red wave. As she was a brilliant tactician, a highly skilled fighter and one his closest friends, he brought her and a cadre of her knights along on his expedition to Kalimdor.

Daelin now lies dead, as do most of his commanders. However, Fairmount lives on, as do many of her knights. Hidden amongst the populace of Theramore, they have continued their campaign against the horde. Unlike the other groups on this list, they are not small groups of fanatics holed away in caves. They are a well organized and equipped army, capable of waging prolonged warfare against their hated enemy. Fairmount has many supporters amongst the populations of Theramore and Onyxhold, and amongst her ranks are tirasian, lordaeronian, dwarven and high elven soldiers.
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Old 09-29-2013, 04:32 PM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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Here's some kezanian action. Poll for the alliance factions added.

The Steamwheedle Cartel
Mogul Gaston Steamwheedle was the commander of a small pirate fleet about thirty years before the first trade wars. For a goblin, especially at the time, Gaston was a quite charming fellow, who cared little abour race. He was one of the first goblins to employ trolls as anything other than slaves, and his contacts in the troll community even allowed him to visit Zandalar a few times.

This also made him one of the few people in the world to have access to zandalari arcanitals. Officially, they were there to secure the interests of the zandalari priesthood. In reality, it was because Gaston paid them fat money (though a similar portion went to the priesthood, which I guess you could count as securing their interests).

One day, while Gaston's fleet was sailing near the western mist barrier, it was attacked by sea giants. Apparently, they did not appreciate it when he plundered some of their vaults. Naturally, when you're being attacked by 21-ton monstrosities capable of slinging anchors with enough force to rip one of your dinky little ships to pieces in a single shot, you give the order to run away. Unfortunately for Gaston, his fleet was surrounded by the giants on three sides, and the western mist barrier on the fourth. He chose to escape into the mists. The rest of the fleet was slowly torn apart by the malevolent mists, but the arcanitals on board Gaston's ship managed to keep it roughly intact all the way through the barrier, allowing it to shipwreck on the landmass on the other side.

Gaston's ship had rediscovered Kalimdor, the first to do so since the continent had been shrouded. Realizing the value of being the only one to know how to access an entire continent full of untapped goods, he formulated a business plan based around exclusivity. During the economic downturn caused by the tirasians dismantling the goblin smuggling network in their territory, Gaston quickly bought up a small fleet of vessels, building materials and employers. Hiring his arcanital contacts once again, he brought this fleet to Kalimdor. Most of his employees had absolutely no idea where they were or how they got here, with only a few navigators let in on the secret.

And thus was born the steamwheedle trading company. With exclusive access to the resources of Kalimdor and a boss smart enough to keep out of the first trade wars, the company quickly grew rich. Former employees weren't allowed to leave Kalimdor, so instead built homes and businesses around the steamwheedle docks, which quickly grew into the city of Ratchet. By the time the trade king was killed, the steamwheedle company was one of the richest goblin companies, and secured its position as one of the five goblin cartels.

In time, the steamwheedle cartel would grow to be the strongest of the five. Careful to never upset the night elves by damaging the nature of Kalimdor, they instead sold goods based on their rarity. Their military was primarily used for intimidation, with the foreign legions made up of monstrous creatures who the steamwheedles claimed were from the netherworld. In reality, they simply employed creatures native to the other side on the planet. The farwanderers (a nickname for tauren banished from their clans) and the dustwalkers (recruited quilboar, harpies, centaur and sand trolls) were used for conflicts in the eastern kingdoms, while the clanless (dwarves that were banished from their clans because they either comitted crimes or there just wasn't enough room or food) were employed for conflicts on Kalimdor.

Now here is where things get weird. You see, according to the steamwheedle officials, Gaston Steamwheedle never died. They claim that he is still the trade prince, despite the fact that the several changes in appearance of the guy in the position. No one knows why exactly this is done, but since the only people likely to meet the trade prince are his employees or potential business partners, everyone just humors the guy and plays along.

In another weird turn, the steamwheedle cartel started supporting the horde between the first and second wars, completely ignoring the official Kezan policy of neutrality, which resulted in the steamwheedle cartel being kicked off the island. Now you'd think that, for such a heavy price, the steamwheedle cartel would do everything in their power to assure the victory of the side they chose, right? Well, not really. All they sent the horde were some zeppelins and sappers.

Despite the horde losing, the steamwheedle cartel did manage to get some profit from it in the form of two new foreign legions. Originating from the isle of Zeth'kur on the world of Draenor, the fireblossom clan of orcs were famed as alchemists and sailors. Being two fairly handy skills for warfare, the fireblossom got a rather favorable position in the horde. In the lead-up to the second war, Orgrim sent the clan to initiate a first strike against the humans of Tel Abim, securing the island so its bananas could feed the horde. Unfortunately for the orcs, the jahaad proved themselves to be a bit tougher then thought. While the orcs managed to destroy most of the cities on the isle in a devestating attack, the surviving jahaad retreated to the jungle. When the orcs landed on the isle, they quickly became a victim of jahaad guerilla strikes, who used a series of poisons that caused delirium and madness. Within two weeks, the orcs had lost half their forces and retreated from the isle (since the only way to completely wipe out the jahaad would have been to set the jungle on fire, which would destroy all the banana trees). Orgrim wasn't exactly happy with that, and ordered the clan dismantled, with the other orcish clans stealing the fireblossom cannons and keeping them as slaves. Only a few fireblossom managed to escape, given refuge by the steamwheedle cartel in return for their service. As a foreign legion, they were called the flowerpickers, a nickname their clan picked up after the failed attack on Tel Abim.
The second foreign legion was formed after the end of the second war. As the orcs were imprisoned, the alliance shifted their focus to the surviving ogre clans, destroying or imprisoning them. However, the dunemaul, stonemaul and gordunni clans were given refuge on Kalimdor by the steamwheedle cartel, in return for some of their clan members serving the steamwheedles as the gronnborn foreign legion.

With the arrival of the horde and alliance on Kalimdor, and the mists that protect the isle being dissolved by the night elves, the market position of the steamwheedles has basically become untenable. The exclusivity which they relied on is gone forever and nothing can bring it back. Because of this, some of the higher ranking members in the steamwheedle cartel absolutely hate the horde and the alliance, though others were quick at using their presence as a new business opportunity. Still others are reserving judgement until it is actually determined whether there is still a market to have a position in; any attempt to contact Kezan has thusfar been unsuccesful, something which is making many of the goblins bloody nervous.
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Old 10-06-2013, 04:25 AM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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And here are the orcs. Admittedly, I'm not too sure about this one. Some frantic attempts to get earlier continuity to fit together, and doing some new things with the clans that I'm not entirely sure of. Any commentary would be appreciated.


The Orcish Horde
Aftermath of the second war (aka frantic attempt to get lord of the clans, warcraft II, warcraft III and day of the dragon to fit into the same continuity)
By the end of the draenor incursion, the orcs had been broken. The twilight's hammer, stormreaver and burning blade clans had been destroyed, leaving only a few dozen scattered survivors each. The shattered hand, thunderlord, black tooth grin, bonechewer, kil'sorrow, laughing skull and shadowmoon clans had been on Draenor when it was torn apart. The few blackrock, dragonmaw and bleeding hollow orcs that had survived their encounters with the alliance by the end of the second war had been put into internment camps in Lordaeron, while the small amount of captured black tooth grin orcs and later the few orcs that managed to escape the destruction of Draenor were put into camps in Azeroth. The orcs, who had a population of over two million only a few decades ago, were reduced to a population of about twenty-five thousand, most of which made up of former non-combatants and peons (a.k.a. The orcs that wouldn't battle until their final breath). Only three clans remained active as organized groups, all three of which had a population that was reduced to a few hundred.

First, there were the remaining fireblossom orcs (also known as the flowerpicker orcs), that had sought refuge amongst the steamwheedle cartel after they were banished due to their failed first strike against Tel Abim. To deal with their withdrawal from the bloodlust, they had been given kaja'mite-laced cigarettes. Over the years, this developed into a severe nicotine addiction, which remained even when the bloodlust faded.

The second group were the remains of the warsong clan. While most of the warsong orcs had been lost with the destruction of draenor, or imprisoned by the alliance forces at the dark portal, a portion of the clan, including chieftain Grom Hellscream, managed to escape. Teaming up with the remaining blademasters of the burning blade, this small group fought an unsuccesful campaign to free their orcish brothers from the camps in Azeroth. Before long, they were flushed out by a combined strike team of knights of the golden songbird and clerics of saint marilyn of the sacred vows, losing over half their members in the process. The remaining warsong orcs, roughly two hundred in number and still pursued by the azerothian forces, fled to the stranglethorn jungle. In a surprise attack against what they thought were alliance soldiers (actually, they were southsea freebooters), they captured a vessel, which they used to escape to a remote region of the Arathi Highlands in Lordaeron, where they spent a decade evading alliance and stromgarde forces, occasionally performing a 'raid' to take food and weapons from remote (and mostly undefended) human villages.

The third group was the frostwolf clan, banished from the horde. Originally, they had hidden in the northern redridge mountains, until they were discovered by a group of dragonmaw orcs and forced to run while being bombarded by catapults. Fleeing into khaz modan, it wasn't long until they were discovered by dwarves and bombarded by mortar teams, forcing them to once again flee northwards. With the horde starting its assault on Khaz Modan by this point, the dwarves were on the lookout for any orcs trying to cross their lands, resulting in the frostwolf clan suffering a few more bombardments. Luckily for the frostwolves, the dwarves were holding out for a long time siege and trying to conserve mortars and soldiers, so they were content to just fire a few potshots at the mostly densely populated parts of the frostwolf camp and have them run off.
Naturally, the frostwolves couldn't run forever. Eventually, they ran into a tiny bit of water known as the thandol passage. Drek'thar and the other frostwolf shamans used a powerful ritual to create floats of ice, that would carry the remaining frostwolves accross the passage. Of course, the other side of the passage wasn't exactly safe either, as the entire continent was on high alert due to the orcish invasion having started by this time. The frostwolves, more than a tiny bit desperate by this point, just fled to the giant mountain range and sought the single most remote, inhospitable valley to go live in, hoping that no one was interested in it.

For about three years, that worked perfectly. However, just prior to the planned horde assault on Lordaeron City, the frostwolf frost wolves brought back the remains of an orcish messenger that had been passing through the valley, bearing a message for the warchief of the horde, who the frostwolves now learned was none other than Orgrim Doomhammer, an old pal of Durotan's.

Durotan, along with his mate, Draka, and their still unnamed baby, travelled to Orgrim's camp near the ruins of Southshore. They were there to report on the nastiness of Gul'dan and his shadow council. While Orgrim had already known about the shadow council itself, he was not yet fully aware of the true extent of Gul'dan's role in it. Orgrim promised that he would kill the son of a bitch. Unfortunately, two of Orgrim's guards were spies for the warlock, sending word to Gul'dan (who hastened his plans and took off for the tomb of Sargeras). These guards were the once assigned to guard Durotan and Draka on the way home, a position which they intended to exploit to learn the location of the frostwolf village. However, Draka told the guards to leave as soon as they entered the mountain range. With their chance at finding the frostwolves gone, they instead killed Durotan and Draka, and left their child to die.

However, the baby was found by Count Aedalas Blackmoore, lord of the nearby Durnholde Keep. By this point, the horde attack on Lordaeron city had failed, and the captives had been herded into an old quarry near Durnholde, placed under the command of Aedelas until the alliance figured out what to do with them. Aedalas knew of Terenas' plans to construct large internment camps. In turn, he himself planned to raise the baby, which he named Thrall, into an orc commander under his control, so he could have a private army of orcs.

With the fall of blackrock mountain, the internment camps filled up with orcs, trolls, ogres and goblins. The trolls and ogres proved themselves rather uncontrollable, many dying in escape attempts or prison brawls. The handful that survived were transferred to the prisons beneath Durnholde, where Aedelas would train and sell them as gladiators, objects of study for the kirin tor or even slaves. The goblins were ransomed back to the steamwheedle cartel for an exorbitant amount of money. This left only the orcs, about thirteen thousand of them, in the northern camps.

Thrall was trained as a gladiator, and given books regarding tactics and strategy, all to better prepare him for leading Aedalas' army. As a warrior, he was almost unsurpassed, combining natural orcish strength and ferocity with the more refined human fighting style. For many years, the young orc accepted his fate, often even enjoying it. However, one day, after Thrall had lost due to having to face an impossible series of opponents and was beaten by Aedalas and several others for all his efforts, he rebelled. With help of a human maiden, he escaped from Durnholde, determined to meet with the last free orcs. First the warsong clan in the east, later the frostwolf clan in the alterac mountains.

Under the tutelage of Drek'thar, he learned more of orcish society and the ways of the shaman, ultimately taking his position as chieftain of the frostwolf clan. The frostwolf and warsong clans reformed the horde, under the leadership of Orgrim Doomhammer, and moved against the northern internment camps, freeing the lethargic orcs within. When Doomhammer fell in battle, Thrall replaced him, leading his by now sizable army against Durnholde itself.

Thrall's horde made itself hard to hit, keeping small mobile settlements throughout the alterac mountains and arathi mountain ranges. Despite that, the alliance forces were closing in, even managing to capture the warsong forces at one point, imprisoning them in a nearby naval base to be transferred to Azeroth. However, the rest of the horde charged in to save them, stealing the seven large ships in the harbor, so they could be used to sail to the ancient lands of Kalimdor (of which The Prophet had told Thrall).

Unfortunately, the seven ships would not be enough to carry the entire horde (especially not if they were also bringing supplies and wolves with them). Instead, the horde split up. Thrall, leading a force of the frostwolf's best warriors, Grom, leading the majority of the warsong clan, and Saurfang, leading the kor'kron, made up of the best soldiers of the other clans, would travel west to Kalimdor, securing a beachhead. Drek'thar would lead those who stayed behind, building simple ships that could carry the remainder of the horde west.

Due to a pact made by the chieftains before the formation of the horde, each and every orc suffered from a magic bloodlust that caused increased aggression, loss of self-control when pushed and a crippling lethargy if kept away from battle or a source of magic for too long. In northern Lordaeron, several demons had appeared to manipulate events. Though these demons had no interests in the orcs, their mere presence on the same continent made the orcish bloodlust much, much stronger, especially for those who had been exposed to demons before. A large group of these orcs, along with others who wised to return to the 'old ways', broke away from Drek'thar's group. Thinking themselves the true successors of doomhammer's legacy, they united under the banner of the blackrock clan.

Those who secceeded attacked the human village of Strahnbrad, capturing many humans to serve as sacrifices for the demons of the burning legion. This in turn attracted the attention of the alliance forces, with the knights of the silver hand sent in to defeat these orcs. While this resulted in the first defeat of the seccesionists (followed a short while later by complete destruction at the hands of the scourge), it did unintentionally distract the alliance forces from the orcs that remained under the command of Drek'thar, giving them enough time to follow their compatriots west.

Current Situation
Though the conflict with the demons is now over, the cost was heavy. 1500 of the new horde's orcs died in the conflict, which may seem like a small number, before you realize that that was over one-sixth of their population and included many of their most skilled warriors. The orcs remain at the brink of extinction, something which a large percentage of the population has trouble coping with. These idiots want the horde to start an all-out war with the quilboar, centaur and harpies (to secure the nation of Durotar), the Night Elves (to avenge Grom), the alliance (to avenge their time in the internment camps) or even the steamwheedle cartel (for not fully supporting the horde in the second war and abandoning them afterwards), not realizing that any such full-scale campaign could be the end of their race. To ensure the protection of his people against threats both internal and external, warchief Thrall runs a very tight ship. Appointing the new chieftains of the freed orcish clans himself, he has created a system where every orc in Durotar is in service to the state. Most see this as a neccesary evil to rebuild their civilization. Others see it as a dictator abusing the current weak state of the orcs to essentially turn them into slaves. Aggravating the situation is that most of Thrall's inner circle consists of orcs who are shamans and/or never lived in the internment camps, which results in a disconnect between rulers and populace.

Currently, there are five active orcish clans within the horde. The most powerful are the frostwolves, who have built the city of Orgrimmar in the redrock crags. Controlled directly by Thrall himself, the frostwolves are the most shamanistic of the clans, and maintain the closest relationship with the alliance. Those who oppose the rule of Thrall tend to view the entire frostwolf clan as cowardly tyrants, staying out of the war so they could force their ways upon the rest of the orcs.

Also in Orgrimmar reside the Fireblossom Clan, or at least a portion of it. As a show of good intentions, trade prince Steamwheedle released the flowerpicker legion from their contracts. Though most remain in the steamwheedle cartel, a few hundred, led by Mathogg, have chosen to refound their clan and join Thrall's horde. While low in number, these fireblossom orcs have proven invaluable due to their skilled alchemists and engineers (providing the horde with Demolishers), experienced warriors and trade contacts in the ratchet community. Their clan also includes several former steamwheedle members from different races, treated no differently than any orcish member. Well, at least by the fireblossom orcs themselves. Some other orcs see them as cultural traitors for having integrated so many of the goblin traditions, from relying heavily on technology, to wearing fancy schmancy clothes rather than traditional orcish outfit and constantly smoking those damn cigarettes.

The blackrock clan, which also includes former members of the dragonmaw and the black tooth grin, has settled to the south of Orgrimmar, building a settlement which they call The Den. Based around an abandoned scorpid tunnel system, most of The Den is located underground, with the surface level only containing fortifications. Because the Scorched Plains are littered with pre-made scorpid tunnels, many abandoned, the blackrock have pre-built mining tunnels, providing the metal and smithing for most of the rest of the horde. Thrall appointed Eitrigg as the chieftain of the blackrock, a move which many of the clan's members despise (though mostly because Eitrigg actually enforces Thrall's vision of the horde, rather than giving in to the more aggressive members within the clan). Most of the anti-thrall mentality is found amongst the blackrock community, particularly the former dragonmaw and black tooth grin.

The bleeding hollow clan, led by Zor Lonetree, is situated in the heartlands of the Great Plains, where they built a settlement on the Crossroads. Since ancient times, the nomadic routes of the Skychaser, Thunderhorn and Dawnchaser tribes brought them to this meeting spot every fall, the three forming a massive encampment for the season before they moved to their winter locations. Because it is located in a fairly fertile part of the barrens, it was the ideal place for the bleeding hollow to settle, building a large farming community. The bleeding hollow maintain close relations with the local tauren, with representatives from the three tribes now permanently living in the orcish settlements. However, the bleeding hollow found themselves a target of the grimtotem last fall, with multiple tauren infiltrating the settlement and murdering over two dozen orcs.

Finally, there are the last remnants of the warsong clan, who, along with the remaining blademasters, live at the northern edge of the great plains in a small fortress they call Mor'shan. Led by Gargok, they guard the northern border of the pact territory, ever vigilant for demons from Ashenvale. As both the warsong clan and the blademasters know that their clans will not survive for long (having only about a hundred people combined), they are accepting students from throughout the pact in the hopes that their martial legacy will remain after they are gone.
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Old 11-02-2013, 09:08 AM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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First six tauren tribes, plus some general stuff

The Gathering
Four hundred and three years ago, Hamuul's grandfather had presided over the last gathering, to discuss the drought that was sweeping the great plains. All fifty-five tribes had attended, and every single one of them had been shocked at how few remained. Now, it was Hamuul's turn to call upon his fellow tribes, to discuss the recent arrivals from the far east.
The ceremony was as ancient as the oldest records of the runetotem. A quick prayer at the bones of the earthmother, asking her to guide the chieftains to this holiest of places. Then, the chieftain would retreat to the abode to pour over all the scrolls written since the last gathering and compose a list of all remaining tribes. For each tribe, a short message would be written, and sealed with a drop of Hamuul's blood.
His time in the abode had taught Hamuul that it had not been a good time for the tauren. Eight tribes had been vanquished entirely, usually at the hands of the centaur. Twenty-three tribes had been crippled so badly that they had to abandon their own legacy, and let themselves be absorbed into another tribe. What struck Hamuul the most was that three tribes had just vanished entirely in the last dozen years, with their neighboring tribes all reporting a loss of contact, but search parties finding no bodies. In the end, only twenty messages had to be sent, carried to their destination by the legend of the white wolf.

Pawe of the Mistrunner was the first to arrive, coming from nearby Sun Rock Post. She was a coquettish young woman, yet to reach her sixtieth year. As was custom, the Mistrunner brought with them a feast of fine cheeses and fermented maple sap, to be shared among the chieftains as a symbol of Mistrunner wealth. With Pawe also came Naal Mistrunner, grainmaster of her tribe, to present the runetotem historians with an index of all the plants they harvested, and their various uses. Pawe herself presented the listing, pointing out several plants that could be useful for the other tribes. Hamuul couldn't help but smile at the thoughtful gift. Pawe, despite her young age, had always had a knack for understanding the ways of the other tribes.

Later that eve came chieftain Asaawaki of the direhorn, along with his current wife, Patki. As the riversides near Bloomwaker Post had proven rich this year, they had with them a dozen braves, each carrying a large sack of corn to be given to the less fortunate tribes. Since last Hamuul had seen him, Asaawaki had undergone the rituals of the sky-father and the sun, with red-and-black tattoos now adorning his entire body.

Only two days later came Haloor of the Longstride, beating out several tribes that had much less distance to travel. As soon as he reached the encampment, the young chieftain blurted out a quick greeting before collapsing. Laughing, Pawe had to assure the runetotem healers that nothing was wrong with Haloor, and they just had to let him rest. As she took a scroll from Haloor's satchel and showed it to the healers, she explained that Haloor had run for five days without stopping, using a mix of herbs Pawe had gifted him with to stay awake. Apparently, he had been planning to impress a girl in his tribe anyway, and decided to combine his show of virility with his call towards the gathering.

Three days passed until the next chieftains arrived. Urek of the Thunderhorn, Berem of the skychaser and Dezco of the dawnchaser came in a single, massive procession, their tribes having joined together for the spring. With them, the three chieftains had brought over a hundred braves, naturalists and hunters to serve as guardians for the gathering, worried that the increasingly bold harpies would attack. Thunderhorn rifles, dawnchaser sun priests and tamed skychaser vultures would make sure the harpies would think twice.

The next few chieftains also came as a group, though they came from vastly different regions. Venerable Cairne of the Bloodhoof, astride his loyal kodo-beast. Kador of the cloudsong, two rain dancers in tow. Amatek of the Hawkwind, his bare torso clad in extensive tattoos. Melor of the Stonehoof, with his iconic steel blade. Sark of the Ragetotem, wearing the ancient war vest of his family. Nara of the Wildmane, shining white fur flowing in the wind. All of them wore red colors, adorned with a sigil Hamuul did not recognize.

That night, lightning started dancing across the sky, marking the arrival of Magatha of the Grimtotem, escorted by a swarm of wind serpents. Along with Magatha came Noholo of the Blackhoof, silently standing in the background, a false face obscuring his expression.

Over the next three days, the last few chieftains arrived. Ornamm of the Highmountain isolated himself in the encampment, refusing to speak to anyone but members of the runetotem tribe. Tempest of Tidus was much the opposite, yapping to the other chieftains so much that Hamuul had to warn him that speaking about the topics at hand before all chieftains arrived was strictly forbidden. Haru of the Stonespire and Nata of the Dawnstrider had brought several enchanted staffs, which they used to perform shows every night, much the to annoyance of Ornamm and the delight of everyone else. Grundig of the Darkcloud, despite having the least distance to travel, was one of the last to arrive. Hamuul was pretty sure that that was meant as an insult against the runetotem.

Last, but not least, was Bena of the Winterhoof, coming all the way from Winterspring on the back of a massive chimaera. The winterhoof were long-time allies of the night elves, and Bena had been escorted to the meeting by a pair of sentinel hippogryph riders. Respectfully, the elves kept themselves outside the encampment, waiting to escort Bena back.



What are the tauren?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ornamm Highmountain
The tauren are the sons and daughters of the earthmother, nieces and nephews of the sun and the moon and brothers and sisters of the world on which we walk. We have been blessed by our heritage, and have been given the gift of the eternal wanderer. Our sacred task is to wander the world, in peace with the spirits of the world. Only the tauren may do this, and those who do not are not tauren.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sark Ragetotem
Ornamm is a fool, stuck in a way of life that would surely see our people extinguished. His mind still lives in the golden age of our people, when hundreds of our tribes controlled the width and breadth of the barrens. That age is long gone. Today, we live in a world where hordes of centaur seek to kill all we love, where we must fight with the quilboar, the harpies and the murlocs over every scrap of food. A category that, according to them, also includes our children. To survive these times, our people have become formidable warriors and champions of the earthmother.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ornamm Highmountain
You speak her name as if you know of her ways. You, and the others like you, stopped being tauren the second you decided to abandon the sacred path of the wanderer and cowered away in your fortresses and on top of your mesas!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asaawaki Direhorn
Are you truly this blind to the world around you? Your tribe lies all but dead, one foot along the path of tradition that has killed a hundred other tribes. The tribes that have abandoned your silly nomadic routines thrive! We have food, comfort, safety. Through us, the legacy of the tauren will continue, while your tribe shall be reduced to a notch on a runetotem scroll.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ornamm Highmountain
If that is to be our faith, so it shall be. We have been tauren in the way we live, and we shall be tauren in the way we die. Your tribes may have a legacy, but it is no better than that of the centaur.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noholo Blackhoof
*angry stare*
The tauren and the horde
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cairne Bloodhoof
The horde has granted the tauren protection whenever we needed it most. When the bloodhoof were at the brink of destruction at the hands of the vile centaur, they brought us to sacred mulgore. Since then, they have stood alongside the ragetotem, the wildmane and the cloudsong against the forces that would see the tauren destroyed. They have proven themselves warriors of honor and allies of the spirits. I am proud to call myself a member of this horde, as the future of our people lies with them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magatha Runetotem
I see little difference between this horde of which you speak so fondly, and the centaur which you revile. They have invaded our lands, stinking of corruption and bloodlust. The few things that put them above the centaur only serve to make them a greater threat to our people. Where the centaur simply seek to destroy our people, these orcs seek to destroy our souls, turning us into more of their own.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ornamm Highmountain
For once, one of you speaks the truth. Those who stand alongside the orcs are no better than the farwanderers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Urek Thunderhorn
While I do not hold the same adoration for the orcs that Cairne does, I don't hold the same opinion as Magatha either. The orcs are a warlike species, this is true. However, their warlike nature might be exactly what we need to recover our people. Already, they have killed one of the sisters bloodfeather, and destroyed most of the quilboar encampments in the eastern peninsula.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bena Winterhoof
My allies can certainly back up the martial prowess of the horde, though they don't seem entirely sure whether or not to trust the orcish nation either. They seem to be beings of honor now, sure, but their history is wrought with darkness and corruption. With them, they bring a legacy of conflict that could tear this land apart.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tempest
When is it that we will stop looking from salvation from another species? Cairne with the orcs, Bena with the night elves, the farwanderers with the goblins. If we simply stood together, the tauren could once again achieve the greatness for which they are destined.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asaawaki Direhorn
And which destiny do you speak of, Tempest? The one your insane cult is trying to achieve? The tauren must stand together to achieve greatness, this is true. But doing it on your terms? Preposterous.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noholo Blackhoof
*nods solemnly*
The Mistrunner Tribe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sark Ragetotem
Bah, a bunch of weaklings. Spending a couple of days in the barrens would do them all good, and help them get over this 'good life' nonsense.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haloor Longstride
Valuable friends and allies. While their lifestyle certainly isn't as resilient as that of other tauren, it is successful enough to enable their boundless friendship and generosity.
The mistrunners are a village-based tribe, operating from Sun Rock Post in the upper dry hills. Central to their culture lies the principle of the good life, achieving peace and prosperity at the lowest cost to nature. The mistrunners will not kill any living thing unless it is strictly necessary. As such, their diet includes neither the meat, nor the plant roots on which the rest of the tribes survive. Instead, they make due with fruits, nuts, grains, tree sap, mushrooms, bird eggs and goat milk.
While the mistrunner won't kill for anything other than self-defense, that doesn't mean they won't scavenge the dead. Mistrunner gatherers will often patrol the habitats of lightning lizards, skinning the creatures that were foolish enough to enter territory. Not even the tauren themselves are exempt from this, as dead mistrunners are skinned just like any other creature. Whenever a lightning lizard dies of old age, the people at sun rock post celebrate, for the leather and bones of the creature are invaluable to the creation of mistrunner tents.
In line with their beliefs about hunting, mistrunner naturalists do not wield any animal spirits. Instead, their totem consists of the peacebloom, the maple tree, the briarthorn and the ghost mushroom.
The mistrunner have not joined the horde or the united tauren tribes, but they are considered allies of the pact of mount hyjal.

The Direhorn Tribe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noholo Blackhoof
*uncertain shrug*
The direhorn are a village-based tribe, operating from Bloomwaker post in the lower dry hills. While other tauren are hunters and gatherers, the direhorn are primarily farmers, producing tons upon tons of corn. The direhorn are known for their generosity, sharing their crop in an effort to ensure the survival of the tauren as a whole.
That said, the direhorn have very few actual allies among the other tauren. They regard themselves as standing above most other tribes, who they regard as dumb primitives, and regard the aid they give to the other tribes as a burden that comes with their superiority. They do make exceptions for some tribes though, as they hold a degree of respect for the thunderhorn, the stonehoof and the grimtotem.
The direhorn employ priests, who serve as agents of the sun, the moon, the earth mother and/or the sky father. Rarely, these priests are known to perform sacrificial rituals, offering a captured harpy to the earth to ensure a good harvest.
The direhorn are opposed to the horde, the steamwheedle cartel, the alliance and the united tauren tribes. While this opposition does not manifest in any overt aggression on their part, they will attack those that come too close to their lands. It is rumored that the direhorn are in negotiations with the grimtotem though.

The Longstride Tribe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cairne Bloodhoof
Some have called this tribe reckless and irresponsible with the lives of its people. I can make no claim regarding this. But what I do know is that the longstride can survive things no other tauren ever could.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ornamm Highmountain
It saddens me that a tribe that befriends the farwanderers is still the closest the rest of my people come to being true tauren.
The longstride are a nomadic tribe, operating from Camp Taurajo in the northern field of giants. The longstride are expert survivalists. When a longstride tauren becomes an adult, he leaves the tribe, not taking anything with him. For thirty days and thirty nights, he must survive alone in the barrens. Many longstride repeat this ritual several times over their lives, or choose to commit other acts of extreme physical prowess, honing their survival skills to near-perfection. Unfortunately, many do not survive the ritual, and their tribe is very small as a result.
Longstride naturalist have a totem that consists of the raptor, the plainstrider and the swoop.
The longstride are members of the pact of mount hyjal and the united tauren tribes. They are also the only tribe to not shun the steamwheedle farwanderers, and are known to purchase dragon rifles.

The Thunderhorn Tribe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bena Winterhoof
While their alchemical interests have thusfar had only a single success, it's a really good one.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melor Stonehoof
Clever hunters that keep the harpies in check. That is something I can admire about this tribe. I am, however, not so certain of the company it keeps...
The thunderhorn tribe are a nomadic tribe, based out of Camp Orakke in the north-western great plains, and they are one of the three tribes that form the crossroads each spring. Their most notable achievement is the invention of tauren firearms, which have made them amongst the greatest of tauren hunters. Whereas other races that use guns extract their gunpowders from crude oil, the thunderhorn combine sulfur crystals, charcoal and bat guano.
Because this compound is much more naturalistic than normal gunpowder, thunderhorn rifles can channel shamanistic power, which is famously used by the thunderhorn naturalists. Their totem consists of the bat, the lightning lizard, the vulture and the lion.
The thunderhorn tribe are allies, but not members, of the horde, and are members of the united tauren tribes.

The Skychaser Tribe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asaawaki Direhorn
Even amongst primitives, the skychaser stand out as simple-minded savages.
The skychasers are a nomadic tribe, based out of Camp Harune in the north-eastern great plains, and they are one of the three tribes that form the crossroads each spring. They are one of the tribes that has abandoned worship of the earthmother altogether, though some core tenents of her religion have survived in the skychaser tribe.
Like most tauren, the skychaser believe that all living beings carry with them both a spirit of their own, and that these spirits unite to form a greater communal spirit that represents the entire species. However, they do not believe that these communal spirits are then united into the worldwide spirit known as the earthmother. Instead, they worship these spirits directly. Instead of naturalists, seeking to combine aspects of nature, they have priests of the lion, priests of the kodo and priests of the plainstrider. Skychasers keep large amounts of these animals as well, and Camp Harune is often referred to as 'zoo-town' by the steamwheedle cartel.
The skychaser tribe are members of the horde, but not the united tauren tribes. Amongst the non-crossroads tauren, they have a reputation as savages, embracing the animalistic nature of their spirits far too much. Some tribes even go as far as to claim the skychaser aren't full-blooded tauren, but have animal ancestors. This isn't helped by some of the skychaser priesthood embracing this legend as truth.

The Dawnchaser Tribe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noholo Blackhoof
*pulls fingers along neck to indicate throat-slicing*
The Dawnchasers are a nomadic tribe, based out of Camp Mokalle in the south-western great plains, and they are one of the three tribes that form the crossroads each spring. They are one of the tribes that has abandoned worship of the earthmother altogether, and solely worship An'she.
Despite that lack of worship of the eartmother, they uphold almost all of the tauren traditions. They are nomads and hunters, they honor the ancestors and the world around them and they still uphold the codes of tribal interaction. As a result, their relation with the other tribes is a bit odd, as for most traditional tauren, spirituality and tradition are pretty much the same thing. Relations with the other tribes tend to switch drastically when those tribes change chieftains. Ornamm's father was a close ally of the dawnchaser, and even spent three years living among them. Ornamm, on the other hand, regards the dawnchasers as the worst of the tribes, tricking others into thinking they're true tauren by hiding behind a veneer of tradition.
One of the few things that has remained a constant through thousands of years of shifting relations is that the blackhoofs absolutely hate the dawnchasers. As the blackhoof aren't exactly eloquent when other tribes are around, the exact reasons for this remain unclear.
The dawnchaser tribe is a member of the horde, but not the united tauren tribes.
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Old 11-18-2013, 02:38 AM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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Fun fact: I made way too many goddamn tauren tribes. Sure, there are good reasons for there being so many. Each tribe only gets a single village, so to represent a civilization, you need a lot of tribes. Plus, some of the tribes (wildmane, winterhoof, grimtotem, dawnstrider, stonehoof) live outside the area available in the first game.
On the other hand, it's way too much typing. With these six, we still got nine more to go.

The Bloodhoof Tribe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asaawaki Direhorn
It lightens my heart to see that another of the primitive tribes has taken its first step towards advancement. Though they still have a long way to go.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ornamm Highmountain
And thus, we lose one of the last true tribes of tauren. Where once stood hunters of pride now stand traitors and heretics.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sark Ragetotem
Great friends and allies, who stand with us at the treshold of a new age of greatness.
Until very shortly ago, the bloodhoof were a nomadic tribe, based out of Camp Neheja in the south-eastern barrens. However, last year, their summer encampment was attacked by a massive horde of centaur, intent on adding yet another tauren tribe to the body pile. What no one could have predicted though was the arrival of Thrall and his orcs, who helped the bloodhoof fend off the centaur and aided them in the long trek to the safe haven of Mulgore.
Mulgore, traditionally, was regarded as the sacred valley of the tauren, and they weren't allowed to enter it except for specific ceremonies. The great ragetotem fortress of Dalsh-Beran, established during the second great drought, made sure no one could enter or leave the valley. However, with the incredibly losses the tauren had suffered (and chieftain Sark Ragetotem really not caring all that much about religion), Cairne was able to convince the ragetotem to let his people pass.
The bloodhoof felt indebted to Thrall, and have since joined the horde. In addition, they brought the horde in contact with many of the other tribes, some of which also chose to join the horde. The ragetotem were the first, providing warriors for the battle of mount hyjal. The wildmane followed soon afterwards, with the horde reinforcing ghost walker post in return for the aid of the spirit walkers. The cloudsong, Hawkwind and Stonehoof all followed. In the last few months, the chieftains of these tribes have formed an official new tauren nation, called the united tauren tribes, which now contains a full half of the tribes. The united tribes are a member state of the pact of mount hyjal, and many (but not all) individual tribes are members of the horde.
The bloodhoof are a hunting-oriented tribe, always seeking worthy prey among the great animals of the barrens. In addition, they have a special bond with the kodo, even more so than the other tauren tribes, utilizing them in large numbers as mounts. The kodo is naturally one of the bloodhoof totem spirits, along with the boar, the turtle and the lion.

The Cloudsong Tribe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asaawaki Direhorn
Pitiful idiots
As the bloodhoof fled to Mulgore, the centaur turned their attention to the other tribes in the region. The ragetotem of Dalsh-beran were well-prepared to fight any attack by the centaur. The Longstride simply scattered whenever the centaur attacked in force. The stonespire summoned forth water and flame to fend off any attackers. The massive warriors of the highmountain simply charged the centaur before the centaur could charge them. The cloudsong and hawkwind, two small nomadic tribes, were not as well-prepared as those tribes. Now facing the brunt of the attacks with little military strength to back them up, they were also forced to retreat to Mulgore.
The cloudsong are famous as musicians, playing bone-crafted flutes and rain-shakers to communicate with the spirits of the sky. In concordance with their ancient ceremonies, they can alter the weather, creating sunny skies, light rain and even massive storms, depending on the needs of the spirits of the earth. While those sound useful for military purposes, the cloudsong rain dancer priests can only maintain such feats of power for a short period of time.
The cloudsong are members of the united tauren tribes, the horde and they share the city of Thunder Bluff with the Bloodhoof and the Runetotem.

The Hawkwind Tribe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bena Winterhoof
Brothers in spirit, in service of the guardians of old. Had they not joined the horde, I would have invited them north
As the bloodhoof fled to Mulgore, the centaur turned their attention to the other tribes in the region. The ragetotem of Dalsh-beran were well-prepared to fight any attack by the centaur. The Longstride simply scattered whenever the centaur attacked in force. The stonespire summoned forth water and flame to fend off any attackers. The massive warriors of the highmountain simply charged the centaur before the centaur could charge them. The cloudsong and hawkwind, two small nomadic tribes, were not as well-prepared as those tribes. Now facing the brunt of the attacks with little military strength to back them up, they were also forced to retreat to Mulgore.
The hawkwind are an extremely non-traditionalist tribe, dismissing not just the existence of the earth mother, but the very idea that the spirits of the earth are of any consequence. Instead, they are the servants of Eleia, mother of all the skies (also known as Aviana). They are allies of all that carries feathers, and can call upon the powers of wind and bird in battle.
The hawkwind are members of the united tauren tribes and the horde. They maintain their nomadic lifestyle within Mulgore, operating from Camp Narache.

The Stonehoof Tribe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sark Ragetotem
Bastards can't fight worth a damn, but by Awak Aki, do I love 'em.
The stonehoof are a mesa-based tribe from Freewind Post. They are highly reclusive and more than a bit secretive, preferring to spend their days in contact with the stones around them. Despite this, they are highly valued as allies, as their communion with the earth has turned them into skilled smiths, probably the most capable ones on Kalimdor (at least, before the dwarves arrived). Almost all of the finest artifacts in tauren history, and even some legendary night elf weapons, can be traced back to the handiwork of this tribe.
Generally, the stonehoof don't communicate with any outsiders. However, they do maintain friendly contacts with two of the other tribe: The ragetotem (who purchase much of the stonehoof's handiwork, trading it for skins and meat) and the dawnstrider (who regularly aid in enchanting the weaponry). Despite their reclusiveness, they have joined the united tauren tribes and the horde, seeking protection against the rising centaur aggression.

The Ragetotem Tribe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sark Ragetotem
WRAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAGH!
The ragetotem are a village-based tribe, based from the ancient fortress of Dalsh-Beran. For millenia, this fortress has guarded the gates of Mulgore, manned by the fierce warriors of the Ragetotem tribe. Clad in stonehoof-forged steel, the ragetotem spend most of their lives preparing for battle, either facing animals in melee combat as part of a hunt, or performing elaborate training rituals using the massive totem weaponry favored by the tribe.
The ragetotem employ very few naturalists. Instead, their warriors tend to align themselves with one or two of the ragetotem totem animals. These animals are the lion, the scorpid, the crocolisk and the gazelle.
The ragetotem are staunch allies of the horde, having found their kin among the orcs. In addition, they are also a member of the united tauren tribes.

The Wildmane Tribe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamuul Runetotem
Though we are vested in the same history and traditions, the morbid nature of the wildmane admittedly unnerves me.
The wildmane are an ancient off-shoot of the runetotem tribe, basing themselves in Ghost Walker Post at the kodo graveyard in Desolace. Rather than dedicate themselves to the entirety of tauren lore and history, a small group of loremasters chose to focus entirely on the legend of the deathwalker, about an ancient tauren chieftain whose willpower was so great, he returned from beyond the pale to avenge his own death. The lorewalkers chased the chieftain's steps through all of Kalimdor, eventually finding his place of resurrection at the Kodo Graveyard in Desolace. Here, they meditated on the legend. On every detail of his history. Trying to replicate his ancient miracle.
They succeeded.
The wildmane are a tribe that lives between life and death. Their society is based around the spirit walkers, white-furred tauren born as a result of the wildmane connection to the legend of the deathwalker. These spirit walkers are neither alive nor dead, phasing between the realms of the living and the dead. For them, those who have fallen are as real and close to them as those who still live. The greatest of spirit walkers even have the power to pull back fallen tauren from beyond the grave, restoring them to their body. While this causes an initial period of weakness, there are few other side effects.
And they really do need the ability. The wildmane live in Desolace, homeland of the centaur, and one of the most dangerous regions of Kalimdor. Without the spirit walkers, the wildmane would have fallen centuries ago. Even now, the wildmane often find themselves at the brink of extinction, centaur threatening to overwhelm them through sheer numbers. Many of the wildmane braves have died over a dozen times, carrying scars from their various lethal wounds as proud trophies. To find aid in protecting Ghost Walker Post, the wildmane joined the united tauren tribes and the horde.
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Old 11-27-2013, 04:56 AM
Mina6871 Mina6871 is offline

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Thanks for sharing.
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Old 12-16-2013, 04:32 AM
ijffdrie ijffdrie is offline

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Haven't updated this in a while... Tauren tribes are still a work in progress (though I've also got a more detailed history of stormwind and a background expansion for the darkspear ready). I have been distracted mostly by trying to figure out the metaphysics and cosmology of the world. I think I got it right, but I'll need to think out the consequences.

But, since I was bored and inspired, have a evolutionary chart of the various arcane disciplines that stem from the well of eternity
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