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  #26  
Old 07-11-2014, 07:15 AM
Aneurysm Aneurysm is offline

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I chose aneurysm as a nickname partially because I enjoy pronouncing that particular word.
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  #27  
Old 07-11-2014, 07:16 AM
Nazja Nazja is offline

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Jaundice is too beautiful a name...

Last edited by Nazja; 07-11-2014 at 07:26 AM..
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  #28  
Old 07-11-2014, 07:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aneurysm View Post
I chose aneurysm as a nickname partially because I enjoy pronouncing that particular word.
Aneurysm's good, ya ya. The -ism bit is what really makes it sound like what a brain aneurysm must be like.
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  #29  
Old 07-11-2014, 07:55 AM
Royalpimp Royalpimp is online now

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Defiance - there's something rebellious and powerful about it that excites me.

Hellion - Similar to 'defiance' but a bit edgier.
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  #30  
Old 07-11-2014, 10:04 AM
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Unsavoury ~ A nice contradictory word. One often says that someone is "unsavoury" in the sense that that person is distasteful. However, the traditional opposition to "savoury" is "sweet". Therefore, if one is "unsavoury", perhaps one is sweet? One could use it in either sense, I suppose. That's why it is quite nice. I also quite like the sound.
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  #31  
Old 07-11-2014, 10:31 AM
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Panache is nice. It rolls off the tongue like butter.
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  #32  
Old 07-11-2014, 11:25 AM
miffy23 miffy23 is offline

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Unfathomable - means just what it sounds like.
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  #33  
Old 07-11-2014, 11:30 AM
Nazja Nazja is offline

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Naught isn't a great word for naught. Just look at how classy it looks and sounds.
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  #34  
Old 07-11-2014, 11:31 AM
miffy23 miffy23 is offline

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Naught isn't a great word for naught. Just look at how classy it looks and sounds.
Naughty.
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  #35  
Old 07-11-2014, 11:33 AM
Eagan Eagan is offline

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Naught isn't a great word for naught. Just look at how classy it looks and sounds.
Nooooo! The correct spelling is "nought"! Don't become Americanised, please! Save us all!
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  #36  
Old 07-11-2014, 11:34 AM
miffy23 miffy23 is offline

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagan View Post
Nooooo! The correct spelling is "nought"! Don't become Americanised, please! Save us all!
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/naught
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  #37  
Old 07-11-2014, 11:36 AM
Eagan Eagan is offline

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Originally Posted by miffy23 View Post
Read your own dictionary entry, German-speaker!
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"a variant spelling (esp US) of nought".
They don't even use it properly. We read "0.8" as "nought point eight". They'd read it as "zero point eight".
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  #38  
Old 07-11-2014, 11:37 AM
Nazja Nazja is offline

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagan View Post
Nooooo! The correct spelling is "nought"! Don't become Americanised, please! Save us all!
Don't they have slightly different meanings in British English?
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  #39  
Old 07-11-2014, 11:38 AM
miffy23 miffy23 is offline

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Originally Posted by Eagan View Post
Read your own dictionary entry, German-speaker!

They don't even use it properly. We read "0.8" as "nought point eight". They'd read it as "zero point eight".
"Variant spelling" does not mean "incorrect spelling", my friend.
It's living, breathing language and it is an entirely valid way of spelling the word. Potato, potatoe.

Also, you should know I am born and raised bilingually and have always been an English native speaker.
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  #40  
Old 07-11-2014, 11:41 AM
Eagan Eagan is offline

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Originally Posted by Nazja View Post
Don't they have slightly different meanings in British English?
It depends. Usage is slightly mixed. "Nought" always means "zero", and "nothing". "Naught" survives in poetic usage as a variant of "nought", meaning only "nothing" (and never "zero", for some reason). Functionally, there is no difference between the two. They are both derived from the same word, and mean the same thing. English spelling isn't standardised, so both have survived. I'm in favour of choosing one word and sticking with it, and given that "nought" is the more common variant in British English, and given that the word (spelled either "nought" or "naught") is used more commonly in British English, I've decided to stick with that.
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  #41  
Old 07-11-2014, 11:47 AM
Nazja Nazja is offline

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagan View Post
It depends. Usage is slightly mixed. "Nought" always means "zero", and "nothing". "Naught" survives in poetic usage as a variant of "nought", meaning only "nothing" (and never "zero", for some reason). Functionally, there is no difference between the two. They are both derived from the same word, and mean the same thing. English spelling isn't standardised, so both have survived. I'm in favour of choosing one word and sticking with it, and given that "nought" is the more common variant in British English, and given that the word (spelled either "nought" or "naught") is used more commonly in British English, I've decided to stick with that.
I like naught though, not nought. I also like the name dreadnought, so both will get their due recognition.
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  #42  
Old 07-11-2014, 11:51 AM
Eagan Eagan is offline

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Originally Posted by Nazja View Post
I like naught though, not nought. I also like the name dreadnought, so both will get their due recognition.
I suppose that is the strength of the English language, allowing spelling to be as one likes it. However, I am staunch against the tide of horrid Americanisms (unless they provide some previously absent utility).

Would you say 0.8 as "nought point eight" or "zero point eight"?
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  #43  
Old 07-11-2014, 11:56 AM
Nazja Nazja is offline

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagan View Post
I suppose that is the strength of the English language, allowing spelling to be as one likes it. However, I am staunch against the tide of horrid Americanisms (unless they provide some previously absent utility).

Would you say 0.8 as "nought point eight" or "zero point eight"?
Zero. Spanish is my maternal language, so zero it is.
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  #44  
Old 07-11-2014, 11:59 AM
miffy23 miffy23 is offline

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"Nought" as used for the mathematical "zero" is dying out anyway.
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  #45  
Old 07-11-2014, 11:59 AM
Eagan Eagan is offline

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lowtide View Post
Zero because a number including 00 sounds idiotic your way.
In British-style, one would usually say "double nought" or "double oh", in that case. One would never say "nought nought".

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Zero. Spanish is my maternal language, so zero it is.
I suppose that is as good a reason as any.

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Originally Posted by miffy23 View Post
"Nought" as used for the mathematical "zero" is dying out anyway.
It remains standard usage in Britain, and has shown no sign of "dying out". It was never standard in American usage.
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  #46  
Old 07-11-2014, 12:10 PM
miffy23 miffy23 is offline

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Quote:
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It remains standard usage in Britain, and has shown no sign of "dying out". It was never standard in American usage.
You're the only British person I know actually using it, and I know many (highly educated ones, too).

Not to say it's wrong to use it, it's a lovely word and I like it. Just - it really is slowly dying out.
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  #47  
Old 07-11-2014, 02:49 PM
Eagan Eagan is offline

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Quote:
Originally Posted by miffy23 View Post
You're the only British person I know actually using it, and I know many (highly educated ones, too).

Not to say it's wrong to use it, it's a lovely word and I like it. Just - it really is slowly dying out.


I guess you don't watch much British television.
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  #48  
Old 07-11-2014, 02:58 PM
Saranus Saranus is offline

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I like slake. As in slake your thirst. It just sounds so satisfying. Like chugging cool water after a hard day of physical labor.

Incorrigible is a good one too.

Also, onus.
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  #49  
Old 07-11-2014, 03:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miffy23 View Post
You're the only British person I know actually using it, and I know many (highly educated ones, too).

Not to say it's wrong to use it, it's a lovely word and I like it. Just - it really is slowly dying out.
Oxford has noughth week, definitely not zeroth week.

Other good words pointed out in this thread include Incorrigible, Defenestration and Skedaddling. Also heard the word Insipid used on Masterchef last night. Great word. Also, thinking about it, pustule. Blancmange.

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On soft grey mornings widows cry, the wise men share a joke. I run to grasp divining signs to satisfy the hoax...

Intercourse. Nonono the word, intercourse! Good and woody! Intercourse. Pert pert thighs, botty, botty botty. Erogenous zone. Oh concubine! Erogenous zone! Loose Woman! Erogenous Zone!
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  #50  
Old 07-11-2014, 05:13 PM
Cantus Cantus is offline

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Gratuitous. There's a grand horror about it. Not just that something is wrong, but it's so wrong that it's honorific. Virulent is similarly inclined, a word with a strange vitality, alive and yet not.

And of course I can't help but mention Sublime, one of the most subtle words I've ever encountered for the enormity that it contains. As one of my professors aptly put it, "It's so beautiful it's terrifying."
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